Tag: Carl Jung

Carl Jung ~ Death is Not the End

Carl Gustav Jung, often referred to as C. G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology. Click to zoom

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The Myth, the Hero and the Lie

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20 September 2011

Teacher: Tom Kenyon

This is very lengthy...but on the bottom there is an exersice of how to integrate our shadow-self,which feels very effective to me.I hope that it may serve you, Love Johanna

The co...

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The Path and the Law Of Causation

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11 September 2011

Published September 10

Reposted from The Awakening Website

Law of Cause and EffectThe Law of Causation states that every cause has its effect; every effect has its cause; everything happens according t...

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And Away We Go…

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By Allison Rae

“Anyone who perceives his Shadow and his Light simultaneously sees himself from two sides and thus gets in the middle.” – C.G. Jung

These final, still moments of the waning moon are filled...

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Déjà Rêvé?

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Déjà Rêvé?

Ian Wilson 2011

Second Revision Public Domain Copyright Withheld by Author

Abstract

This paper examines the very real phenomena of Déjà Vu and how it con...

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Amygdala – The amazing brain music adventure

Source: http://viewzone.com/amygdala/indexx.html

By Neal Slade

I want you to think of the best time you have ever had in your life........Got it?

Now, multiply that experience, that feeling, times ten. Multiply it times a hundred, o...

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The Meaning of Deja Vu

"Déjà Vu" is a common intuitive experience that has happened to many of us. The expression is derived from the French, meaning "already seen." When it occurs, it seems to spark our memory of a place we have already been, a person we have already seen, or an act we have already done. It is a signal to pay special attention to what is taking place, perhaps to receive a specific lesson in a certain area or complete what is not yet finished.


In “Second Sight” I describe many theories to explain déjà vu: a memory of a dream, a precognition, a coincidental overlapping of events or even a past life experience in which we rekindle ancient alliances. What matters is that it draws us closer to the mystical. It is an offering, an opportunity for additional knowledge about ourselves and others.

During a trip to Africa, Carl Jung described a feeling of déjà vu when he viewed a slim, black man leaning on a spear looking down at his train as it made a turn around a steep cliff on the way to Nairobi. He writes, "I had the feeling that I had already experienced this moment and had always known this world." Although this world and this man were something alien to him, he saw the whole thing as perfectly natural. He called this a recognition of what was "immemorially known."

In Western culture, we are brought up to consider anyone who isn't an immediate member of our circle of friends and family to be a stranger. Yet at times, you meet people whom you feel as if you have known for years. You can talk to them about anything and they understand. You laugh easily with them. The tone of their voice, the way they take their coffee, all seem commonplace. It isn't that they remind you of someone else or that their qualities are simply endearing. You relate to them not as strangers, but as people with whom you have shared history, members of the same tribe.

A patient of mine named Shannon knew that she was going to marry her husband the day that they met. She had dated a lot of men following her divorce, but none of them felt right. Then, she met Bob. There was something about the way he smiled, the glint of his hair, his voice and the shape of his hands, that made her think that they had known each other before. After talking it was clear that their paths had never crossed, but after their first lunch date, they became inseparable. What Shannon and Bob immediately felt for each other was more than just physical chemistry. It was a natural compatibility and a depth of intimacy that usually emerges after couples are together for many years. They were married two months after they met and have been together now for ten years.

I’m often asked how to tell the difference between a feeling of déjà-vu when we first meet someone and an attraction stemming from an addictive obsession. Some addiction specialists say that whenever you meet someone and an explosion of fireworks go off, this is a sign not of true love, but of one neurosis meeting another. They suggest that you run as fast as you can in the opposite direction.

Based upon my work with the recovering community, I agree that there is a strong tendency among addicts and some non-addicts to try to "fix" themselves with love and sex, rushing prematurely into relationships inspired only by intense physical attraction. They often have nothing to do with déjà-vu, but stem rather from a basic emptiness that longs to be filled. There is no true bond between the people involved, they hardly know each other, and these partnership attempts fail miserably when the pink glow of newness wears off.

The fact that an encounter feels compelling or immediate doesn't necessarily mean that it is healthy or unhealthy. The experience of déjà vu must always be approached discerningly. However, mostly déjà-vu experiences are not obsessive or compulsive. They rather convey a quality that is quiet and solid..

The possibility of having a déjà vu is inherent in partnerships of all kinds, particularly the more intimate ones. It can occur in business, friendships and family, often leading to pivotal outcomes that can impact the direction of our life.

There are situations that are glitches in time, when the rules bend and the mystery takes hold. Enchanted moments that sparkle. These are deja-vus. They can take place anywhere, at any time and with anyone. Your real estate agent might show you a house that feels so familiar and right, you instantly know it is yours. Or perhaps you are in a restaurant and sense an inexplicable kinship with a woman sitting in the back corner booth. Don't let these possibilities pass you by. Take notice; investigate. There is no way of predicting where each might lead or what it will teach you. Summoning the courage to take a chance and act on synchronicities, to have faith in what is not yet visible, will make the experience your own.

Adapted from Second Sight: An Intuitive Psychiatrist Tells Her Story and Show You How to Tap Your Own Inner Wisdom (Three Rivers Press, 2010) by Judith Orloff MD

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Alice Time: Choosing Six Impossible Things To Believe In

I am an “Alice-o-phile”. I adore Alice in Wonderland and have forever and ever. My basement stairwell is painted as a Rabbit Hole and I have a collection of Alice art and copies of Alice because early on, I understood the message of Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass at an archetypal level.


Alice is our escort into the many absurd notions, ideas, politics and policies, beliefs and attitudes that underlie society and the way we see “reality”. And oh how long and absurd this list is of beliefs we are so convinced are true, important, real, and urgent. Why just the other day, I overheard a woman at the gym say to her friend, “I’ve got to hurry. If I don’t get this report in to my colleagues, the business deal we’ve been working on will be toast.”

“That’s absurd,” I thought. “If that report were so important – if you were so important to the business deal - what on earth are you doing at the gym?” Silly, silly girl – and now, I thought, she is going to rush away from the gym in a state of “It’s all about ME-ness”. An “Alice moment”, if there ever was one – and there are plenty in my world because I see so much “through the Looking Glass”. (Seeing through the Looking Glass requires that you reverse what you’re looking at, viewing everything through its opposite. If something appears complicated, see it as simple. People always look for “something”. Note this classic line from A through the LG: “I wish I could see nothing as well as you can.” Brilliant…)

We live in a world that is completely in love with going in the wrong direction. For example, we live in a society that completely trusts the rational mind to structure and order “reality”. (For starters, just look at what the rational mind has produced: wars, weapons, bio-destructive forces, environmental disasters, politics of deceit, religious corruption, false gods and bogus religious myths, bizarre notions of what’s real and what isn’t – like the doctrine of creationism in this, the 21st century, though civilization is much older than 21 centuries.) The absurdity of what we believe to be true and yet, how we behave as a “civilized” people is incomprehensible – much less how we go about negotiating our definition of being civilized. But enough of that…you get the picture.

Let’s jump back into Lewis Carroll and his magic. He delighted in satirizing the love affair that members of Victorian society had with themselves and, in particular, their addiction to snobbery. He looked at what the upper class could not bear to examine about themselves, which was, in essence, their own lavish lifestyles, attitudes, and well maintained prejudices about the way the world was and simply had to remain in order to keep them happy. But it is precisely this addiction to one’s personal enclosed comfort zone that positions a person to become exactly what he or she believes an elite lifestyle and privilege protects a person from becoming: close-minded, irrational, unyielding, unrealistic, and completely out of touch with the world at large. To say this another way: The more a person has to lose in life, the less likely that person is to welcome change or to embrace the vast world of the imagination.

Social and political revolutions have always been initiated at the grass roots level because those at the “top” have the most to lose. They see no reason for society to change, because from where they are sitting (Wall Street), everything looks just fine. Those who can envision energy technology, for instance, and have urged the auto and other industries for decades now to invest in energy technologies, have done so for several reasons, among them these two: First, they can see the handwriting on the decline of the oil-based economic wall. That is, we have to move in the direction of alternative fuels. But secondly, these visionaries simply can imagine the impossible. These are the people who are not afraid to take a risk and go where others have not yet gone in thought, in action, and yes, in investment in financial resources.

Carl Jung adored the realm of the imagination. He may well be the master explorer of our age of this domain. For him, the imagination contained the passageways to the psyche and the inner voices of our archetypes. Active imagination was an essential tool that he introduced, establishing a form of communication between the conscious and unconscious self. Right there we have something to imagine as impossible: opening a portal of communication between your conscious and unconscious self. That may be getting ahead of yourself a bit, but such a mega-thought does qualify for imagining the impossible, if you have never, in fact, considered undertaking such an endeavor.

Imagining the impossible – what a delicious and positively enchanting notion. And yet, the realm of the imagination is a fully and completely threatening place to suggest to a person who fears the loss of the familiar. As children, the world of the imagination is an acceptable playground because children are not yet rational creatures and a child’s imagination is considered cute – to an extent. Children are supposed to have imaginations – for a while. Technically speaking, if one can say such a thing, the psychic boundaries of children are still porous; therefore, they are subject to the “hallucinations” of the imagination. These include, for example, imaginary playmates and perhaps seeing the occasional fairy or sprite. Dark spirits may even show up. But a child is likely to be told that these nonphysical visitors are not “real”, they are merely “imaginary”. Thus, early on the lines in the sand are clearly drawn: What comes from the mind is “real”; what comes from the imagination is, well, imaginary. Not real. A poof of a thing, no more than a whimsical passing thought form.

Now granted the mind has “poofs” all the time, ideas that run through it this way and that, but because such thoughts come from the mind, these are not the same type of “imaginary” thoughts because…well…because they can perhaps wear the label of “practical” or “provable” or “conventional”. A value is made apparent very quickly to baby humans: If you are going to delve into the impossible, just make sure it’s the “practical impossible” and that your ideas can solve problems or increase production or profits somewhere. Having ideas just for the fun of having ideas is well, impractical! A waste of imaginary income – not that a person imagines or visualizes income….well, perhaps people do. But do such thoughts really qualify for “imagining” or just wishing? That question leads us to this most important question: Do people really know how to fall down the Rabbit Hole? It’s an art, after all, and not an accident.

The Art of Falling Down The Rabbit Hole

I’m an expert on falling down the Rabbit Hole. I live in the world of the imagination and the impossible. I rely upon the imagination to fill me with ideas on a continual basis. If I lived in the ordinary world, I would disintegrate in short order because the ordinary world is a place filled with reasons why ideas can’t succeed and with the wounds of failure and painful memories of the past that keep reminding people that they should live fearful lives instead of inspiring ones. In fact, even while writing this, a friend called for a business-related matter but in warming up to our meeting, he asked what I was doing. I told him I was writing a piece based on Alice in Wonderland. He asked if I liked the movie. I said, “Not really, and I suspect Lewis Carroll would not have cared for it either. Alice was meant to be enchanted in Wonderland and not be disappointed by characters who were defeated by an angry Red Queen.” He asked me why I loved Alice so much and I carried on and on about my many reasons and even brought the wisdom of Alice into the nonsense of the politics of Washington – which was not all that difficult. But after all that, he said, “I have an idea,” and off we went into the realm of the imagination, into the world of what is waiting to be created, ideas just waiting for a chance to incarnate.

Falling down the Rabbit Hole requires the capacity to “let go” and allow your imagination to take flight, giving form and vision to possibilities and impossibilities – before you let your mind tell you they are absurd, ridiculous, too expensive, and then that final blow, “What will people say?” What do you care what people say? I never have – and that is the great secret of the Rabbit Hole. You simply have to get over your fear of what other people think. For what possible reasons do you care what other people think?

Now to be clear – I am speaking of creative ideas, not of running out on my responsibilities, incurring huge debts, shooting up drugs, or deciding on a life of theft. So let’s be realistic about what I am speaking about when I speak about not caring about what other people think. I still have my head on straight and my feet firmly planted on the ground – but not my imagination. That part of me is given full reign to go off to places known and unknown to me. My target is the realm of ideas, original thought, creativity, and accessing the deep resources of your soul from which springs your “charism” or your “unique creative grace.” Visionaries and creative geniuses know this inner sanctuary, as do great poets, writers, and pioneers of science and medicine. This is where Emily Dickenson dwelled as well as Shakespeare, Mozart, Bach, Einstein, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. They all fell down their unique Rabbit Holes. They imagined worlds that did not yet exist and their lives became devoted to incarnating those worlds. I have no doubt that they imagined far more than six impossible things before breakfast every morning.

It’s easy to tell who has what it takes to sojourn down their Rabbit Holes. Within seconds of conversing with people, they say something that reveals whether they are courageous or frightened, or whether they essentially travel backwards all the time. They soon reveal whether they have the stamina of spirit to explore the unknown in their life or whether most of their decisions are aimed at keeping everything the same as it always has been. Backward travelers will never be able to find their Rabbit Holes. They have to be content with reading Lewis Carroll and simply wishing their life could be different. They will find it difficult to penetrate into the realm of the imagination, as there is a profound difference between wishing and imagining.

Wishing Versus The Power of The Imagination

Wishing has little, if any, real power. It’s musing at best and a passing thought or fancy in its weakest form. A wish is a temporary enchantment that lacks the backbone and substance to attract creative life force or power.

Imagination, on the other hand, takes effort, energy, and generates a substantial amount of emotional and psychic response once you make contact with a great idea. Merging with a unique vision is the same as having an unfamiliar download of grace rush through your system. In an instant, it penetrates into your intellect, your emotions, your mind, your vocabulary; your archetypal dynamics adjust themselves to new symbolic content – shifting your understanding of the cosmos. You can feel the power of that idea – that vision – take hold of you as it runs through your blood like a new drug, making its way into your neurology. And then it’s locked into your psyche. It’s yours. The download is complete and you are on a high that is unexplainable to anyone who has never been swept away by the thrill of contact with the realm of original thought. This is a love affair unlike anything on earth because it isn’t of the earth. But it soon will be – that becomes your task as the vessel of the imagination.

Original thought implodes someone who won’t do what’s required to be a container and vessel of that which others cannot see or comprehend. You have to be someone who can handle being misunderstood or keeping your own creative company or handling a vision others cannot understand. You have to be strong enough to believe alone – and for a long time – in what others cannot imagine. Many people have been able to do that, but most people cannot stand alone in the demanding realm of the imagination. So they live in the lesser world of fantasies and musings.

What if you really could fall down the Rabbit Hole? Would you? Doesn’t it tempt you even a little – or perhaps more than a little? Wouldn’t you love to let yourself go and tumble into your own great unknown – the unknown that is your own unimagined life that you could imagine if you fell down the Rabbit Hole? You know you would.

You could tell yourself this is just a game, so let’s just say this is just a game. Okay – falling down the Rabbit Hole is just a game. (But what if it isn’t? I had to say that – I just had to.)

Falling down your Rabbit Hole requires that you dwell in the world of your imagination. But really dwell in it. Nurture it. And here’s the challenging part: You have to do what your creativity calls for, in order to bring forth the ideas you are imagining. They won’t just fall from the sky. Books, for example, don’t write themselves. Great discoveries in medicine just don’t happen. Poets actually sweat over their poems even though they’ve been completely saturated with the grace of imagination. You must understand that you form a working partnership with your imagination. Consider that one never forms a working partnership with a wish – how absurd is that? Fairy tales always lead a person to believe that a “wish” alone does all the work. Now really – a wish and a bunch of fairies – and people believe this more than they believe in mystical consciousness. And you talk about absurd????? Anyway – on to the impossible – which is utterly possible.

Believing in Six Impossible Things Per Day

This could be the most fun exercise I have ever given you, by the way. Do NOT answer these questions rapidly. Answering rapidly is an indication that you do not want to give reflective thought to these questions which – let me point out – you have never been asked before. Therefore, you can’t possibly know the correct response right off the top of your head. These questions require reflection. And they are questions in search of responses versus “answers”.

1) Define what’s impossible versus what’s possible for you. You’ve said to yourself, “That’s impossible.” What were you talking about when you said that and why was “that” – whatever that was – impossible? Too risky? Too much money? Would you risk looking foolish?
2) What’s the key difference between what you see as possible versus impossible? In particular, you are to carry this description all the way to the point of including “consequences”. That is, what would be the consequences of the things in your life that you declared were impossible – because in identifying the consequences, you are naming what you are really afraid of experiencing?
3) Everyone travels backwards because everyone has a history. The object now is to determine this: How often each day do you travel backwards in time? All day? Most of the day? Occasionally?
4) Are most of your decisions aimed at keeping your life as it is or introducing change? What is your rationale for your decisions: Safety or new experiences and adventure?
5) Do you tend to dismiss the creative ideas of others, looking for why new ideas of suggestions won’t work as opposed to why they could work?
6) Is there some part of your life that you would like to move forward that would be assisted by believing in six impossible things?

Imagining Six Impossible Things

Start anywhere. Or you can build all six impossible ideas around a strategy, all supporting the desire to break through something. Imagine something in your life that you would like to be other than the way it is. Imagine something absurd, for instance, or you doing something you have never done before. For example, imagine yourself wearing something you’ve always wanted to wear, or imagine yourself speaking to a neighbor that you really do want to meet, or imagine yourself climbing a tree.

Here’s the real point of this exercise: Holding these imaginings is symbolic of the White Queen in Alice – pure new thought. Consider the Red Queen the aggressive part of your mind that will come to do battle with pure thought, pure imaginings, pure creativity. The Red Queen will always try to destroy a creative gift as the Red Queen represents the opposition of the collective unconscious as well as your external world and your own inner saboteur, so you must meet that force on your inner battlefield. If you can grasp that, then you can understand that the object of imagining the impossible is a multileveled discipline that introduces you to the power of your imagination and creativity as well as to your inner saboteur.

But imagining is ultimately not enough. You have to do more than just imagine. You have to act on something that you imagine. You have to bring it forth and give it life. The “impossible” requires vigilance and dedicated attention and constant courageous choices as well as a willingness to allow your life to change in “impossible” directions – directions transcendent of north, south, east, and west. Imagine that.

How often should you make a list of six impossible things? That all depends on how daring you are and how bold an imagination you have. In this regard, there are no rules. You decide. My list is endless.

Just go for it. Enter the realm of impossibilities. One of the most delicious lines Emily Dickenson ever wrote was: Dwell in impossibilities. She obviously resided down the Rabbit Hole. It’s no wonder she is my favorite poetess.

Love,
Caroline

© 2009 Myss.com - Caroline Myss is a New York Times best-selling author whose books include Anatomy of the Spirit, Why People Don’t Heal and How They Can, Sacred Contacts, and Entering the Castle. Defy Gravity: Healing Beyond the Bounds of Reason, will be published by Hay House in October 2009.
Listen to Caroline every week on www.HayHouseRadio.com

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Synchronicity: How We Relate To This Mystical Law

As most of you can tell by now, I love a good conversation. To me, dinner with people who know how to discuss delicious topics is one of the great pleasures of life. I don’t even have to include dinner – I just threw that in. A great conversation can take place anywhere, anytime. What makes a conversation “great”, as it were, at least for me – is that my imagination is animated, or I am inspired to think about something in a way that I had not considered it before, or I learn new facts, or I discover a whole new field of information, or I encounter someone who thinks in a way that is so unique that I just want to listen and observe his or her mind in action. So the other day I had the opportunity to have one of those great and delicious conversations with someone who had imagination and depth and wisdom, and so off we went into a discussion of the nature of mystical laws. The conversation didn’t start out exactly on that topic. It began with this question that he asked me, “Are you more fascinated by what you can see or by what you cannot see?”


Now how many people would think to ask you that?

As soon as I heard the question, I almost swayed into another dimension: Am I more fascinated by what I can see or by what I cannot see? I replied that I was more drawn to the dimension of the unseen. He asked for an example and that’s when I submitted as article number one: The Mystical Law of Synchronicity. I said that I was fascinated by that law and how its alchemy comes together within each of our lives. As a visual, imagine this law as an alchemical dynamic comprised of several chemicals that may or may not create a spark overhead. Conditions have to be perfect – but what exactly are those conditions? Imagine, then, that you want to interact with those conditions – you want to become an active variable in the creative dynamic of the law of synchronicity. Is that even possible and if so, what would you have to know and become – not do – but become in order to interact with the law? How intriguing is this? (Said another way, how could such a question not intrigue someone?)

Carl Jung brought the mystical law of synchronicity into common parlance and then it made its way into mainstream awareness. Commonly understood, it refers to a coming together of events that happen to coordinate or parallel with something that you are experiencing at that same time. Sometimes a synchronistic event is localized, meaning that the psychic event and the physical event occur in the same place at the same time. Jung called that the first category of synchronistic events. Thinking of someone and then seeing that person one minute later or receiving a phone call from them five seconds after you thought of his or her name are examples of what he would call the second category of synchronistic events; that is, two people having mutual thoughts of each other separated by distance.

We have all experienced synchronistic events – some on a small scale, some on a grand scale. They happen all the time. Can a person influence the Law of Synchronicity? How fascinating is that question? What makes a synchronistic event or moment come together? And are some people more receptive to synchronistic events than others? All of those questions are worthy of an afternoon’s lecture (which is why I’m doing a workshop on the Mystical Laws in April), but I’ll address each one in brief. (Other Mystical Laws include the laws that govern Fate and Destiny, the Mystical Laws of Healing and the Mystical Law of Transformation).

Why is knowledge such as this so important? Because you interact with these laws with every breath you take. Nothing about your life is casual or happenstance. On the other hand, literature abounds about how you can “create your own reality” just by thinking “positive thoughts”. How many positive thoughts? One? Two? Is creating your whole reality really that simple? What about all your negative unconscious thoughts – what happens to them? The tendency in this contemporary spiritual society is to take these extraordinary Mystical Laws and reduce them to a user’s guide to happiness - not that there is anything wrong with happiness. But you miss the whole galaxy by focusing on only one planet, if you see what I mean. These laws govern the invisible universe and suggest that an ideal harmony (not happiness but harmonious balance) coexists between the soul realm and the physical. That same relationship in the macro realm is what each person contains in the micro as an individual and thus these laws operate as a mini-universe within each human being.

We are born knowing this truth, though not in the intellectual detail with which I am now communicating it. Rather, we are born with an inherent awareness of these Mystical Laws. We are born with a type of yearning to experience awe and to be blown away by greater-than-ordinary events. And if they do not happen naturally or supernaturally (as in Divinely inspired), then we create them just to get our adrenalin going at max speed because that part of us longs to break through the barrier of “earth speed” in order to touch mystical weightlessness. Ask anyone who pushes the envelope why they risk their lives doing the most outrageous sports, for example, and their responses hint at a longing for a mystical experience. Many speak of “losing themselves in the moment” or “feeling weightlessness” just for a second, as if time stands still. That’s a description of a mystical experience, not a physical one. It’s the best a person can achieve on his or her own without the addition of maximum “grace speed”, but it’s most certainly a taste of the thrill of “mystical weightlessness”. No wonder athletes get addicted to the “high” of those experiences. They literally and symbolically are “highs”.

The Law of Synchronicity, then, is one of many Mystical Laws that govern the invisible world. These Mystical Laws work in partnership with the laws of the physical realm, such as motion, speed, gravity, etc. The Mystical Laws work in subtle ways, but they are as intimate as our breath. When are we not “thinking” or “emotionally reacting” or stressed or unstressed or creating or angry or not angry or in love or broken hearted? We are, in other words, always “in psychic motion” and our energy is at least a part of the substance these laws use to function within our lives.

Just like the athletes experiencing a weightless high during a peak experience, it’s possible to sample that same sensation when you become aware that you are in the midst of a synchronistic event. Immediately your senses become more alert as you shift from just glancing over the environment you are in to scanning in for miniscule details, each one on reserve for potential symbolic significance. Instantly you begin to wonder about the “meaning” of that particular moment over the other ordinary moments of that day when nothing synchronistic occurred. Such questions lift your thinking above the ground. Where? To mystical heights – a synchronistic event ultimately makes you wonder about purpose, meaning, significance, fate, and destiny. Granted, your wonderment will not always be overwhelming with each synchronistic event but because these are, in essence, mystical sparks – a merger of the psychic and physical realms coming together – you are experiencing a mystical law in motion acting directly through the corridor of your life. And that is awesome.

As I briefly describe my own observations about the Law of Synchronicity, I want you to think of yourself as an active variable. You are the X-factor in your own life, an active ingredient that can initiate a synchronistic event or dispel the energy of one. You are the object, then, that needs to be understood in addition to the Law of Synchronicity.

  1. Can a person influence acts of synchronicity; that is, are some people more likely to experience synchronistic events, and if so, why? We can and do influence all the Mystical Laws, including the Law of Synchronicity. This particular law seems to be far more animated around a person who lacks a heavy emotional/mental/psychic history. Said another way, a person who lives primarily in “present time” is living in harmony with the natural energetics of this law.
  2. Adaptability and respond-ability are two qualities that seem to magnetize synchronicity. A person’s willingness to adapt to the opportunity that a synchronistic event presents with minimum hesitation jumps right into the magic of the moment. That person has “respond-ability”. This is a big deal as most people hesitate out of over-caution and fear of the consequences of their actions. As a result, most people continually look to their past for inspiration as to what to choose next, and many times they end up stuck. The ability to recognize an opportunity as a synchronistic “Divine set up” and then respond to that moment in a way that grounds that opportunity ensures a person of a “follow-up” synchronistic experience, if not a series of them. This is a person who is now living in the flow of a mystical law.
  3. A person cannot make a certain type of synchronistic event happen. We have no control over the types of events or the timing of them.
  4. Why and when synchronistic events happen seems to be connected to greater or lesser choice points in a person’s life. The significance of these choice points varies but the common thread is that a synchronistic moment or experience is a choice point.
  5. You as the active variable should take time to reflect upon whether you are a psychic anchor in your own life or someone who is capable of an immediate and dynamic response. That is a question worthy of hours and hours of reflection and not just as regards the Law of Synchronicity, but all the other Mystical Laws as well. Specifically, someone who fights change, who fears the unknown and new ideas and suggestions weakens or depletes the energy field required for synchronistic events.

Continuing on with my conversation:

My friend and I chatted for quite some time about the Law of Synchronicity and my observation about how being in present time increases the likelihood of synchronistic events. How can that not happen? It’s so energetically logical. Of course, our conversation had to include this question: Can and do people know when they are sabotaging a synchronistic event? Fascinating question. I’ll have to ponder that one and save the answer for my upcoming workshop on the Mystical Laws.

Meanwhile, let me leave you with this insight: When a synchronistic event/moment occurs, it does so because certain elements of the psychic realm and the physical realm match. I always take that as a signal that I am standing at a crossroads, a choice point. That choice may not be huge – or it may be. But I always ask myself during a synchronistic moment, “What choice occurs to me?” and then I act on it.

This Universe is a mystical wonderland, to say the least. So I will leave you with the question that started my conversation with a dear friend, “Are you more fascinated by what you can see or by what you cannot see?” Reflect upon that, now imagining that there is no such thing as empty space.

Love, Caroline

© 2009 Myss.com - Caroline Myss is a New York Times best-selling author whose books include Anatomy of the Spirit, Why People Don’t Heal and How They Can, Sacred Contacts, and Entering the Castle. Defy Gravity: Healing Beyond the Bounds of Reason, will be published by Hay House in October 2009.
Listen to Caroline every week on www.HayHouseRadio.com

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The Multidimensional Potential of Human Beings

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