Tag: Commander (page 1 of 6)

PREPARING FOR FIRST CONTACT Chapter 22 Light Partners with Nature By Sharman the Pleiadian

View Article Here   Read More

PREPARING FOR FIRST CONTACT Chapter 23 LIZA’S JOURNAL By Liza the Human Through Sue Lie

View Article Here   Read More

Monumental New Republic Intel – Republic Update – October 19, 2016

View Article Here   Read More

Commander Ashtar: Taking Responsibility for the Future of the Earth – September 23, 2016

View Article Here   Read More

Comander Ashtar – September-23-2016

View Article Here   Read More

Pleiadians – Light Partners with Nature – September-11-2016

View Article Here   Read More

RV UPDATE: KEEP UP THE FAITH PORDA 9-9-16 GALACTIC FEDERATION OF LIGHT

View Article Here   Read More

DISCLOSURE RV/GCR ANNOUNCEMENT SOON! WAKE UP CALL: MUSHABA 82216 GALACTIC FEDERATION OF LIGHT

View Article Here   Read More

When was the Galactic Federation First Introduced to the Public? ~ Greg Giles

One of the many headquarters of the Church of Scientology,this one located in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe name Galactic Federation and this alleged space fleet's mythology was not first reported to humanity through 'channels' or so-called 'psychic med...

View Article Here   Read More

Ashtar via Pallas Athena Sept 11 2015 Galactic Federation of Light

View Article Here   Read More

UFO Crash in Canada? No says military Canadian Forces

 Posts like these were circulating on Twitter and Facebook on Wednesday night, with people suggesting there was a UFO crash near Jackhead, Man. It was actually an airplane being used in a military training exercise, according to the Canadian Forces.



Excerpt from cbc.ca

Social media reports of a possible UFO sighting last night near Jackhead, Man., are not true, says the Canadian Forces, which attributed the bright light people saw to an airplane from a training exercise.

On Wednesday night (Feb 18th, 2015), several people said on Twitter and Facebook that they saw a bright light in the sky, fuelling speculation that it may have been an unidentified flying object.

The rumour became stronger when photos were posted of Canadian Forces vehicles in the area, with some people claiming the military was there to contain a UFO crash site.

But it was not a UFO at all, says Lt.-Col. Paul Davies, commanding officer 38 Territorial Battalion Group, which is involved in an Arctic Response Company Group training exercise on Lake Winnipeg this week.

Exercise Arctic Bison 2015
Members of the Arctic Response Company Group drive across frozen Lake Winnipeg during Exercise Arctic Bison 2015. (MCpl Cameron Skrypnyk/DND)


"There's no aliens, just my friends in the air force who are out there helping us on this exercise," Davies told CBC News on Thursday.
"I have the commander of that air force contingent sitting right beside me and, you know, he assures us that that was not a UFO, but that was him."

About 150 military personnel are taking part in Exercise Arctic Bison 2015, which includes the 38 Canadian Brigade Group, the 2nd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, the 4th Canadian Ranger Patrol Group, and 440 Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Davies said soldiers are training to deal with a plane crash and provide ground search and rescue support in the Arctic.

The bright light that people saw, he explained, came from an airplane that takes off very quickly.

"From a distance it may have looked like it was going straight up in the air, but it wasn't," he said. "It was just us out there playing our games."

The exercise wraps up on Sunday.

View Article Here   Read More

Cape hopes to be world’s busiest spaceport in 2016



A United Launch Alliance Delta IV rocket, with the
A United Launch Alliance Delta IV rocket, with the Air Force’s AFSPC-4 mission aboard.(Photo: United Launch Alliance)


Excerpt from news-press.com


With two dozen rockets projected to blast payloads into orbit, Cape Canaveral this year hopes to claim the title of "world's busiest spaceport," the Air Force's 45th Space Wing said Tuesday.
"It's a great time to be here," said Col. Thomas Falzarano, commander of the Wing's 45th Operations Group. "Business is booming."

Falzarano presented the Eastern Range launch forecast to several hundred guests at the National Space Club Florida Committee's meeting in Cape Canaveral.

Weather, technical issues and program changes frequently delay launches, so it's likely some of the missions will slip into next year. But the forecast shows the Space Coast launching at an increasingly busy clip even without human spaceflight missions, which aren't expected to resume for several years.

The 2015 forecast anticipates United Launch Alliance matching last year's total of 10 Cape launches, including eight by Atlas V rockets and two by Delta IV rockets.

And it assumes as many as 14 launches by SpaceX. Last year had six Falcon 9 flights.

That was SpaceX's most launches in a calendar year, but five fewer than was projected last January.


This year the company hopes to activate a second launch pad, complementing its existing one at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The debut of the Falcon Heavy rocket from a former Apollo and shuttle pad at Kennedy Space Center would be one of this year's most highly anticipated launches.

In addition, SpaceX plans to launch more ISS resupply missions, and commercial and government satellites.


ULA's first launch of the year is coming up Tuesday, with an Atlas V targeting a 7:43 p.m. liftoff with a Navy communications satellite.

The Boeing-Lockheed Martin joint venture has its usual slate of high-value science and national security missions. The manifest includes a roughly $1 billion NASA science mission, an X-37B military space plane and more Global Positioning System satellites.

Overall last year, the 45th Space Wing supported 16 space launches — five less than projected last January (all attributed to SpaceX) — plus two Trident missile tests launched from submarines.
That ranked the Cape No. 2 behind the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakstan, Falzarano said.

But with 24 missions potentially on the books this year and more than 30 in various planning stages for 2016, Falzarano said the Eastern Range is facing its busiest two-year stretch in more than two decades.

"The Cape, right here, is going to be the busiest spaceport in the world," he said.



Growing launch rate
2013: 14
2014: 18
2015: 24 (projected)
Source: U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing

View Article Here   Read More

Mysterious X-37B Space Plane Returns to Earth After Nearly Two Years



Excerpt from nbcnews.com

By Devin Coldewey

No one seems to know much about the Air Force's X-37B secret space plane except that it appears to be working exactly as designed. The unmanned Boeing-built craft, which resembles a miniature space shuttle, returned to Earth on Friday after nearly two years — 674 days, to be exact — in space. It's the X-37B program's third mission to space and by far the longest.

The plane landed at 9:24 a.m. local time on Oct. 17 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Air Force's 30th Space Wing announced. 

"The 30th Space Wing and our mission partners, Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office, Boeing, and our base support contractors, have put countless hours of hard work into preparing for this landing and today we were able to see the culmination of that dedication," Colonel Keith Balts, 30th Space Wing commander, said in a release. "I'm extremely proud of our team for coming together to execute this third safe and successful landing. Everyone from our on console space operators to our airfield managers and civil engineers take pride in this unique mission and exemplify excellence during its execution." 

But just what did the X-37B do up there? Officially, the Air Force isn't telling. 

What is known is that the X-37B has no human pilot, or at least not one in its windowless cockpit. It's operated remotely and lands on its own.

The plane's size means there isn't room on board for much except avionics equipment, fuel for the thrusters, and a mysterious cavity about the size of a truck bed that could contain all manner of sensors, experiments, hardware — perhaps some bacterial colonies, or a bomb. No one can be sure what's inside.

View Article Here   Read More

Older posts

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License
.
unless otherwise marked.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy



Up ↑