Tag: conjunction (page 1 of 2)

NEW LINK UP SYSTEM FOR MULTI GALACTICS: Lisa Transcendence Brown

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Unity Connected Realities or Separation Disconnected Realities? Lisa Transcendence Brown

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God: Heavenletter #5734 – You Are the Conjunction of the Stars – August 6, 2016

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"Catastrophic end" for out-of-control space cargo ship ~ Video from Spacecraft Cockpit

Excerpt from cbsnews.com A Russian Progress cargo ship bound for the International Space Station spun out of control Tuesday. Engineers were unable to direct the wayward ship and soon gave up any hope that it would be able to dock t...

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Jupiter Wins the Starring Role in February’s Planet Parade

Excerpt from nbc.com Planets are on parade in February's night sky. Giant Jupiter will dazzle all nig...

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4 Sky Events This Week: Inner Planets Dance While Saturn Dazzles


Illustration of moon pairing with star in the Virgo constellation
The moon pairs with the brightest star in the constellation Virgo on Tuesday.
Illustration by A.Fazekas, SkySafari


Excerpt from news.nationalgeographic.com

An eclipse of a volcanic moon by the king of planets, Jupiter, will thrill stargazers this week, as Earth's moon rides above the ringed world, Saturn.

Moon meets Maiden. On Tuesday, January 13, early birds will enjoy a particularly close encounter with the last quarter moon of the month and with the bright star Spica. All the action takes place in the constellation Virgo, the Maiden, halfway up the southern sky at dawn.

The 250-light-year-distant star appears only 2 degrees below the moon, a distance equal to about the width of your thumb held at arm's length.

It's amazing to realize that the light from Spica left on its journey to Earth back in 1765. That's the year that Great Britain passed the Stamp Act, the first direct tax levied on the American colonies and a prelude of the parliamentary oversteps that led to the American Revolution.

Mercury at its best. Look for faint Mercury about a half-hour after sunset on Wednesday, January 14, just above the southwestern horizon.

The innermost planet will appear at its farthest point away from the sun, a moment called the greatest elongation. Sitting 19 degrees east of the sun, it would be challenging to track down its faint point of light if it weren't for the nearby, superbright Venus.

The planetary duo will appear only 1.3 degrees apart, making the pair particularly impressive when viewed through binoculars or a small telescope. Look carefully and you may notice that Mercury appears to be a miniature version of the half-lit moon...

Illustration of Venus and Mercury in close conjunction in the southwest sky
This skychart shows Venus and Mercury in close conjunction in the southwest sky after sunset on Wednesday.
Illustration by A.Fazekas, SkySafari

Volcanic moon eclipse. Sky-watchers armed with telescopes will witness a distant eclipse of Jupiter's moon Io in the early morning hours of Friday, January 16.

At 12:27 a.m. EST, the gas giant's own shadow will glide across the tiny disk of the volcanic moon, which will be visible to the west of the planet.

Also early on Thursday night at 10:56 p.m. EST, Jupiter's massive storm, the Great Red Spot, crosses the middle of the planet's disk. Appearing as an orange-pink oval structure, this hurricane circles the planet every 12 hours or so and is three times larger than the Earth. 

Illustration of Jupiter in the late night southwest sky
This wide-angle skychart shows the location of Jupiter in the southeast sky on Thursday evening and early morning Friday. The insert telescope view shows Jupiter and location of its moon Io just before it enters the planet’s shadow.
Illustration by A.Fazekas, SkySafari
Luna and Saturn. Later on, near dawn on Friday, January 16, the waning crescent moon will appear to park itself just 2 degrees north of Lord of the Rings.

The ringed world can't be missed with the naked eye since it is the brightest object visible in the southeastern predawn sky. Its proximity to the moon will make it that much easier to identify.
Train a telescope on this yellow-tinged point of light, and it will readily reveal its stunning rings, tilted a full 25 degrees toward Earth. Currently Saturn sits nearly 994,000 miles (1.6 billion kilometers) away from Earth, which means that the reflected sunlight off its cloud tops takes 87.4 minutes to reach our eyes.
Happy hunting!

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Star Disappears in a Warp In Space-Time


Time warp created by a pulsar



Excerpt from popsci.com

A star has slipped out of view thanks to the space-time warp it creates as it orbits.

The disappearing star is part of a binary star system called J1906. It's a pulsar, which means it's a rotating neutron star, the result of a massive star collapsing in on itself. Researchers have been studying the young pulsar for five years to determine what kind of companion star was orbiting around it. That is, until recently, when the pulsar vanished.

As a pulsar rotates, it emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation, sort of like light coming from a lighthouse. Scientists use radio telescopes that pick up on the pulses coming from the star. But as scientists watched J1906, the pulsar began to slip off the radar. It seems that as the pulsar spins around its companion star, the mass of the companion star makes it sink into a dip in space-time, so that its radio waves can no longer reach Earth. The concept is called geodetic precession, which, according to NASA, uses Einstein’s theory of relativity to understand how massive objects like the Earth curve the space around them, influencing the local space-time fabric.  

The video above illustrates the sinkhole in space created by the pulsar as it orbits the second star. As the warp increases, the pulsar's axis shifts (demonstrated by the arrows), so its radio pulses no longer aim toward Earth's radio telescopes.

But the pulsar won’t be out of sight for forever. Lead scientist Joeri van Leewuen from the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy estimates the star will come back into sight in less than 160 years.

The team’s findings were released Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal in conjunction with the American Astronomical Society’s 225th meeting.

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Your August 2014 Guide to the Five Visible Planets



View larger. | The two brightest objects in this photo - and in your evening sky on May 12, 2013 - appeared to be the waxing crescent moon and Jupiter.   In reality, an even brighter planet - Venus - was also up, but buried in bright twilight.  Photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Daniel McVey.

earthsky.org
Skywatcher, by Predrag Agatonovic.
Skywatcher, by Predrag Agatonovic.

Jupiter and Venus have closest conjunction of any two planets in 2014 before dawn on August 18.



Think photo opportunity! The moon is near the planets Jupiter and Venus on August 22, August 23 and August 24.
Think photo opportunity! The moon is near the planets Jupiter and Venus on August 22, August 23 and August 24.
The waxing crescent moon shines close to Mercury on  August 27 and Spica on August 28 and August 29
The waxing crescent moon shines close to Mercury on August 27 and Spica on August 28 and August 29

Closest conjunction of two planets in 2014 before sunrise August 18
Mars and Saturn pop into view as soon as darkness falls throughout August 2014. In early August, look for golden Saturn, ruddy Mars and blue-white Spica, the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, to line up in the southwestern sky. Let the waxing crescent moon help guide you to this bright star and the evening planets on August 1, August 2 and August 3.
Mercury, the innermost planet, transitions into the evening sky on August 8, 2014. However, this world doesn’t climb high enough from the glare of sunset to be visible at mid-northern latitudes. Residents in the Southern Hemisphere may see Mercury late in August 2014, especially as the moon pairs up with Mercury on August 27.

Venus and Jupiter, the sky’s brightest and second-brightest planets, respectively, present the closest planet-planet conjunction of the year in the August morning sky. Jupiter passed into the morning sky on July 24, 2014, and should become visible before sunrise sometime during the second week of August. After watching the Perseid meteors on the expected peak night of August 12-13, cap everything off with a splendid view of Venus and Jupiter at dawn. Here’s a preview of our August 13 program on the upcoming conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.

Special sky events coming up in late July and early August 2014:
Closest conjunction of two planets in 2014 – Venus and Jupiter – before sunrise August 18
See Jupiter and the Beehive cluster before dawn on Wednesday, August 20
Waning moon above two brightest planets at dawn August 22
Waning moon close to Jupiter and Venus at dawn August 23
Southern climes to view moon, Mercury after sunset August 27
Moon and star Spica low in west after sunset August 28
A planisphere is virtually indispensable for beginning stargazers.

Evening planets in August 2014
Mars visible from dusk until late evening.
Saturn from evening dusk until around midnight.
Mercury at dusk, starting late August (at southerly latitudes).
Morning planets in August 2014
Venus before sunrise throughout August.


By mid-July 2014, Jupiter has disappeared into the sunset glare, but, as darkness falls, Mars and the star Spica are closest to each other on our sky's dome for this year.  You can also see Saturn nearby.  Photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Paulo Vinicius.  Thanks, Paulo!
By mid-July 2014, Jupiter has disappeared into the sunset glare, but, as darkness falls, Mars and the star Spica are closest to each other on our sky’s dome for this year. You can also see Saturn nearby. Photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Paulo Vinicius. Thanks, Paulo!
Mars,  via Hubble Heritage Project
Mars sometimes appears small through telescopes, and sometimes appears larger! It all depends on where Earth and Mars are in orbit with respect to each other. In April 2014, Earth and Mars were on the same side of the sun, closest in two years. Mars will remain bright throughout the northern summer of 2014. Image via Hubble Heritage Project.
Use the Big Dipper to locate the star Spica and the planet Mars in July 2014.
Use the Big Dipper to locate the star Spica and the planet Mars in July 2014.
Mars visible from evening dusk until late evening. Although we passed between Mars and the sun in April 2014, and although the planet is not getting dimmer as it lags behind us in its larger and slower orbit, Mars appears respectably bright throughout August, 2014. This ruddy world still shines on par with Spica, the constellation Virgo’s brightest star, which is close to Mars on the sky’s dome.
But Mars is about to go on the move again, in front of the background stars, as Earth flies ahead of it in orbit. Mars starts the month in front of the constellation Virgo, and then moves in front of Libra on August 9. Mars meets up with Saturn near the end of the month.
Let the moon guide you to Mars on August 1, August 2 and August 3.
Then, as August 2014 comes to a close, watch for the waxing crescent moon to join up with Mars and Saturn on August 31.
Saturn via ESO/U. of Oxford/L. N. Fletcher/T. Barry
Thermal infrared images of Saturn from the VISIR instrument on ESO’s VLT (center and right) and an amateur visible-light image (left) from Trevor Barry (Broken Hill, Australia). Obtained on January, 2011. Via ESO/U. of Oxford/L. N. Fletcher/T. Barry
Planet Saturn at the April 28, 2013 opposition (day Earth went between sun and Saturn) from EarthSky Facebook friend D.R. Keck Photography.
Planet Saturn at its April 28, 2013 opposition (day Earth went between sun and Saturn in 2013) from EarthSky Facebook friend D.R. Keck Photography.
Saturn as captured by the Cassini spacecraft in early February 2014.  Cassini has been in orbit around Saturn since 2004.  Many awesome images!
Saturn as captured by the Cassini spacecraft in early February 2014. Cassini has been in orbit around Saturn since 2004. Many awesome images!
Saturn from evening dusk until around midnight. This month, as seen from northerly latitudes, the ringed planet Saturn is found in the southwest at nightfall and early evening. This golden-colored world shines in front of the constellation Libra the Scales. Mars moves toward Saturn throughout August 2014, and meets up with Saturn in late August.
Let the moon help guide you to Saturn on August 3 and August 4, and once again on August 31.
Binoculars won’t reveal Saturn’s gorgeous rings, but a small telescope will. This month, Saturn is highest for the night at nightfall and should be a fine telescopic object at early evening. Saturn’s rings are inclined at about 21o from edge-on in August 2014, showing us their north face. Several years from now, in October 2017, the rings will open most widely, displaying a maximum inclination of 27o. As with so much in space (and on Earth), the appearance of Saturn’s rings from Earth is cyclical. In the year 2025, the rings will appear edge-on as seen from Earth. After that, we’ll begin to see the south side of Saturn’s rings, to increase to a maximum inclination of 27o by May 2032.
Mercury and moon, by GregDiesel Landscape Photography
Mercury and moon on February 27, 2014, by GregDiesel Landscape Photography. Greg managed to catch Mercury just at the beginning of its long March 2014 apparition in the predawn sky.
Mercury at dusk, starting late August (at southerly latitudes). Mercury transitions into the evening sky on August 8, 2014. However, this world doesn’t climb high enough from the glare of sunset to be easily visible at mid-northern latitudes. Some of you photographers might catch it, but it’ll be tough to spot with the eye. If you do get a photo, submit to EarthSky.
Meanwhile, people in the Southern Hemisphere may see Mercury late in the month, especially as the moon pairs up with Mercury on August 27. For the Southern hemisphere, the evening apparition of Mercury starting in August 2014 and continuing all the way until early October will be the best showing of Mercury in the evening sky for this year.
Northerly latitudes … tough luck on this one!
By the time dawn came to the western half of the U.S. this morning (February 26), the moon was below Venus.  Even light pollution couldn't diminish the view of them.  Photo from our friend Christy Sanchez in Denver.  Thanks, Christy.
Venus is bright. Even light pollution can’t diminish the view of it. Photo from our friend Christy Sanchez, in Denver, on February 26, 2014. Thanks, Christy.
You don't need a nearby moon to find Venus.  It's the brightest planet and very noticeable when it's above the horizon.  Here is Venus on April 23, 2014 as captured by Asthadi Setyawan in Malang, East Java, Indonesia.  Thank you, Asthadi!
You don’t need a nearby moon to find Venus. It’s the brightest planet and very noticeable when it’s above the horizon. Here is Venus on April 23, 2014 as captured by Asthadi Setyawan in Malang, East Java, Indonesia. Thank you, Asthadi!
Venus before sunrise throughout August. Venus beams in the eastern dawn sky throughout August 2014, though it is slowly but surely sinking into the glare of sunrise. At mid-northern latitudes, the morning “star” rises nearly two hours before sunup at the beginning of month but only somewhat more than one hour before the sun at the month’s end. Jupiter will become visible in the morning sky during the second week of August, and then will pair up with Venus to present the closest planet-planet conjunction of the year on August 18.
The slender waning crescent moon joins up with Venus in the morning sky for several mornings, centered on August 23.
You need a telescope to observe the phases of Venus. Whenever you see Venus in the morning sky, it is always moving away from Earth and its phase is continually waxing (getting broader). The phase of Venus will be hard to discern now, though, through a small telescope, because this world appears nearly full to us. This month, Venus’ disk starts out about 92% illuminated and ends the month about 97% illuminated. Believe it or not, Venus shines at or near its brightest in the morning (or evening) sky when its disk is about one-quarter lit up in sunshine. That’s because, at such times, the disk of Venus is always larger in our sky than when the planet appears full. Venus’ illuminated portion last covered the greatest square area of our sky on February 15, when its disk was 26% illuminated.
Nonetheless, Venus is always bright. It will remain the brightest starlike object in the morning sky until it fades into the sunrise in late September or early October 2014.
When will Jupiter return? Jupiter was the brightest celestial object to light up the evening sky in early July, but by mid-July it disappeared in the sunset glare. Jupiter should return to visibility in the east at early dawn, starting sometime in the second week of August, 2014. It’ll have a wonderful conjunction with Venus – the year’s closest of any two planets – on the morning of August 18.
What do we mean by visible planet? By visible planet, we mean any solar system planet that is easily visible without an optical aid and that has been watched by our ancestors since time immemorial. In their outward order from the sun, the five visible planets are Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. These planets are visible in our sky because their disks reflect sunlight, and these relatively nearby worlds tend to shine with a steadier light than the distant, twinkling stars. They tend to be bright! You can spot them, and come to know them as faithful friends, if you try.
Bottom line: The moon returns to the evening sky in late July, and then “leapfrogs” over a bright star and two bright planets – Saturn and Mars – in the first several days of August. The closest supermoon of the year comes on August 10, in the midst of the 2014 Perseid meteor shower. Jupiter and Venus have a wonderful conjunction – closest of any two planets in 2014 – before dawn on August 18.




Debra Fryar in Calobreves, Texas captured this photo of the moon and Jupiter on May 31, 2014.  Jupiter was close to the twilight then.  In early July, Jupiter will be even closer to the twilight, about to disappear in the sun's glare.
Debra Fryar in Calobreves, Texas captured this photo of the moon and Jupiter on May 31, 2014. Jupiter was close to the twilight then. Jupiter disappeared into the sunset glare around mid-July 2014.
Jupiter and its four major moons as seen through a 10
With only a modest backyard telescope, you can easily see Jupiter’s four largest moons. Here they are through a 10″ (25 cm) Meade LX200 telescope. Image credit: Jan Sandberg
Jupiter and one of its moons, Io, on February 28, 2014 via Earthsky Facebook friend Derek Brookes.  Thank you, Derek!
Jupiter and one of its moons, Io, on February 28, 2014 via Earthsky Facebook friend Derek Brookes. Thank you, Derek!
Jupiter was rivaling the streetlights on December 29, 2013, when Mohamed Laaifat Photographies captured this photo in Normandy, France.
Jupiter was rivaling the streetlights on December 29, 2013, when Mohamed Laaifat Photographies captured this photo in Normandy, France. 
Jupiter and its four major moons as seen through a 10
With only a modest backyard telescope, you can easily see Jupiter’s four largest moons. Here they are through a 10″ (25 cm) Meade LX200 telescope. Image credit: Jan Sandberg
Skywatcher, moon, planet (looks like Venus) from Predrag Agatonovic.
Skywatcher, moon, planet (looks like Venus) from Predrag Agatonovic.
Venus on Dec. 26 by Danny Crocker-Jensen
Venus on Dec. 26 by Danny Crocker-Jensen
On the moonless evening of December 3, 2013, Chris Georgia took this gorgeous photo of the constellation Orion (above his head and left of the light pole), the planet Jupiter (brightest star-like object at left), and the Gemini stars to upper left of Jupiter: Castor (at top) and Pollux (at bottom). Thank you so much, Chris! View larger
On the moonless evening of December 3, 2013, Chris Georgia took this gorgeous photo of the constellation Orion (above his head and left of the light pole), the planet Jupiter (brightest star-like object at left), and the Gemini stars to upper left of Jupiter: Castor (at top) and Pollux (at bottom). Thank you so much, Chris! 

These are called star trails. It’s a long-exposure photo, which shows you how Earth is turning under the stars. The brightest object here is Jupiter, which is the second-brightest planet, after Venus. This awesome photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Mohamed Laaifat in Normandy, France. Thank you, Mohamed.
View larger. | Venus shining above the rock of Asseu, Gulf of Riva Trigoso, Sestri Levante, Ligurian Sea, Genoa, Italy, November 29, 2013, via Maranatha.it Photography.
Venus shining above the rock of Asseu, Gulf of Riva Trigoso, Sestri Levante, Ligurian Sea, Genoa, Italy, November 29, 2013, via Maranatha.it Photography.
View larger. | Mars and moon as seen from Hong Kong on October 2, 2013 via EarthSky Facebook friend Matthew Chin.  Thank you, Matthew!  Mars is getting easier to see, but it's still pretty close to the sunrise, and it's relatively faint in contrast to how bright it will become in 2014.
Mars and moon as seen from Hong Kong on October 2, 2013 via EarthSky Facebook friend Matthew Chin. Thank you, Matthew!
View larger. |  EarthSky Facebook friend Peter Wong in Adelaide, Australia captured this image of planets and the star Spica in the west after sunset on September 26, 2013.  As seen from the Southern Hemisphere - where it's spring now - the planets are straight up above the sunset.  Thank you, Peter!
EarthSky Facebook friend Peter Wong in Adelaide, Australia captured this image of planets and the star Spica in the west after sunset on September 26, 2013. Thank you, Peter!
View larger. | Moon and Venus on September 7, as captured by EarthSky Facebook friend Ken Christison in North Carolina.  Thank you, Ken!  On Sunday evening - September 8 - the moon will appear much closer to Venus.  The Americas, in particular, will get a dramatically close view of the pair.
Here are the moon and Venus on September 7, 2013 as captured by EarthSky Facebook friend Ken Christison in North Carolina. Thank you, Ken!
View larger. | Mercury, Venus and Jupiter seen when evening fell in Hong Kong earlier today - June 1, 2013 - by EarthSky Facebook friend Matthew Chin.  Awesome shot, Matthew!
Mercury, Venus and Jupiter seen when evening fell in Hong Kong earlier today – June 1, 2013 – by EarthSky Facebook friend Matthew Chin. Awesome shot, Matthew!
View larger.  |  From left to right, Jupiter, Venus and Mercury as seen last night, May 24.  EarthSky Facebook friend Duke Marsh captured this photo in Clarksville, Indiana.
From left to right, Jupiter, Venus and Mercury as seen May 24, 2013. EarthSky Facebook friend Duke Marsh captured this photo in Clarksville, Indiana.
View larger. | The two brightest objects in this photo - and in your evening sky on May 12, 2013 - appeared to be the waxing crescent moon and Jupiter.   In reality, an even brighter planet - Venus - was also up, but buried in bright twilight.  Photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Daniel McVey.
The two brightest objects in this photo – and in your evening sky on May 12, 2013 – appeared to be the waxing crescent moon and Jupiter. In reality, an even brighter planet – Venus – was also up, but buried in bright twilight. Photo by EarthSky Facebook friend Daniel McVey.

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Life Humor!

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Cosmic Awareness Newsletter 2012-01

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7 March 2012

Channeler: Will Berlinghof

Well...Anasazi1 just made me realize that there was no Cosmic Awareness message posted here recently,so here's the most recent one avaiable right one,as the CAC newsletter is for mem...

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THE HIGHER THEY CLIMB THE HARDER THEY FALL

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Spacemuffin: February 15 2012

Feb 15

This is the second part to the article that was titled ‘It’s only Castles Burning.’

We spoke of Mars and Saturn being retrograde at this time, and things will continue...

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Venus-guided Moon phase

Jon Waldrup Hello; On the cusp of December, 2011, in the cycle of the last New Moon before we launch into 2012, and during a Venus-guided Moon phase, I want to let you know of another opportunity to create a unified humanity. This is the Venus/Pluto co...

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Xyx’Na ~ Sacred Galactic Flash Point

by Simeon ChiRa w/ Ascended Master Menon I initially received this term XyxNa (ZYE-na) from Ascended Master Menon for the upcoming special Global Link Transmission by the same name. However, I did not know what it meant, or why it was being used in c...

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