Tag: hemispheres

SHELDAN NIDLE – PROSPERITY PACKAGES 8-2-16 GALACTIC FEDERATION OF LIGHT

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Sheldan Nidle August-02-2016 Galactic Federation of Light

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Buried Mars Glaciers are Brimming With Water

Researchers have identified thousands of glacier-like formations on the planet.
NASA/Levy et al./Nanna Karlsson



Excerpt from news.discovery.com

Glaciers beneath the dusty sands of Mars contain enough water to coat the planet with more than three feet of ice, a new study shows.
“We have calculated that the ice in the glaciers is equivalent to over 150 billion cubic meters of ice — that much ice could cover the entire surface of Mars with 1.1 meters (3.6 feet) of ice,” Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson, a post-doctoral researcher the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen, said in a statement.

Radar images previously revealed thousands of buried glacier-like formations in the planet’s northern and southern hemispheres.
That data has now been incorporated into computer models of ice flow to determine the glaciers’ size and hence how much water they contain.

“We have looked at radar measurements spanning 10 years back in time to see how thick the ice is and how it behaves. A glacier is, after all, a big chunk of ice and it flows and gets a form that tells us something about how soft it is. We then compared this with how glaciers on Earth behave and from that we have been able to make models for the ice flow,” she said.

The glaciers are located in belts around Mars between 30 degrees and 50 degrees latitude, roughly equivalent to just south of Denmark’s location on Earth. The glaciers are found on both the northern and southern hemispheres.

The finding could be an important clue to what happened to Mars’ water. The planet, which is now a cold, dry desert, once had oceans, lakes and habitats suitable for microbial life, results from past and ongoing science missions show.

“The ice at the mid-latitudes is an important part of Mars’ water reservoir,” Karlsson said.

Scientists suspect the thick layer of dust covering the ice has saved if from evaporating out into space.

The study appears in this week’s Geophysical Research Letters.

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Extreme Storms on Uranus Puzzle Astronomers


Infrared Uranus
These infrared images of the planet Uranus show a white spot that is actually a massive storm on the planet. This image was recorded by the Keck II telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii on Aug. 6, 2014 in the 2.2-micron wavelength.


Excerpt from  space.com
By Elizabeth Howell

Uranus is finally having some summer storms, seven years after the planet reached its closest approach to the sun, leaving scientists wondering why the massive storms are so late.

The usually quiet gas giant now has such "incredibly active" weather that some of the features are even visible to amateurs, said Imke de Pater, the project's lead researcher and an astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley. Astronomers first announced the extreme storms on Uranus in August, and have been trying to understand them ever since.

This is by far the most active weather de Pater's team has seen on Uranus in the past decade, examining its storms and northern convective features. It also paints a different picture of the quiet planet Voyager 2 saw when the NASA spacecraft flew by in 1986.


uranus
An infrared composite image of the two hemispheres of Uranus obtained with Keck Telescope adaptive optics. The component colors of blue, green, and red were obtained from images made at near infrared wavelengths of 1.26, 1.62, and 2.1 microns respectively. The images were obtained on July 11 and 12, 2004. The North pole is at 4 o'clock. Lawrence Sromovsky, University of Wisconsin-Madison/W.W. Keck Observatory

"This type of activity would have been expected in 2007, when Uranus' once-every-42-year equinox occurred and the sun shined directly on the equator," research co-investigator Heidi Hammel, of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, said in a statement. "But we predicted that such activity would have died down by now. Why we see these incredible storms now is beyond anybody's guess."

But here's where the mystery comes in: As far as anyone can tell, Uranus has no source of internal heat. Sunlight is thought to be responsible for changes in its atmosphere, such as storms. But the sun's light is currently weak in Uranus' northern hemisphere, so scientists are puzzled as to why that area is so active today.

 


Huge storms on Uranus


Based on the colors and structure of the storm spotted by amateurs, professional astronomers believe it could hint at a vortex deeper in the atmosphere — similar to phenomena spotted on Jupiter, such as the Great Red Spot.

Follow-up observations with the Keck II telescope revealed that the storm was still raging, although it had changed its shape, and possibly its intensity.

Also contributing to the effort was the Hubble Space Telescope, which examined the entire planet of Uranus Oct. 14 in several wavelengths. The observations revealed storms spanning several altitudes, over a distance of about 5,592 miles (9,000 kilometers).

"If, indeed, these features are high-altitude clouds generated by flow perturbations associated with a deeper vortex system, such drastic fluctuations in intensity would indeed be possible," said Larry Sromovsky, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who performed the newer work.

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Mercury to Wow Southern Skywatchers This Week


This week, observers in the Southern Hemisphere looking west just after sunset will have a fine view of the planet Mercury. This will be the view from Melbourne half an hour after sunset.
Starry Night Software


Excert from

Even though Mercury is one of the brightest objects in the sky, very few observers have ever seen the planet in the night sky. That's because it never strays very far from the sun, and is usually lost in its glare.


The red planet will soon experience the great relief of having a half-mile wide lump of icy rock just miss it on a flyby. DNews Space Producer Dr. Ian O'Neill explains just how lucky our ruddy, rocky Milky Way buddy will be. 
This week is one of the rare exceptions to see Mercury, but only if you live south of the equator. The planet was at its greatest elongation from the sun on Sunday (Sept. 21). Because of the tilt of the Earth's axis, this placed it high above the horizon in the Southern Hemisphere, but too low to be observed in the Northern Hemisphere.

Earlier that day, Mercury also passed about half a degree south of the bright star Spica in the constellation Virgo. (Your closed fist held out at arm's length covers 10 degrees of the night sky).

Mercury is slightly brighter than Spica. Further up in the sky, the planet Saturn is intermediate in brightness between the two.

I find the best time to spot Mercury is about half an hour after local sunset. Even then, binoculars are helpful to spot Mercury. Once spotted in binoculars, it’s usually easy to see with the naked eye.

Northern observers will have to wait until early November to catch a view of Mercury in the dawn sky.

Also this coming week, on Tuesday, Sept. 23, the sun will reach its equinox, crossing the celestial equator moving southward. This marks the first day of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, and the first day of spring in the south.

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