Tag: new (page 77 of 167)

Way Cool or Totally Gross? Funeral home will light up the sky with ashes of loved ones in fireworks show


"Alright, just what did this s.o.b. die of anyway?" 
Greg Giles


Excerpt from examiner.com

Ingenuity is the driving force of the economy. A new, exciting idea can set a business in a class of its own. Throughout history, we've seen various companies make their mark on society with a clever idea; you can now add Greenlawn Funeral Homes to that list. The crematorium, based in Springfield, Missouri will display on Saturday a new way to spread cremated remains… with fireworks. 
Called the “Firework Memorial program,” specially assembled fireworks with a loved one’s ashes will be launched into the air and spread with the help of explosives. There may be no better way to go out with a bang.


The family of Greenlawn’s funeral director, Jim Carver, will inaugurate their new memorial method this weekend. The ashes of his father James, who died in 2008, will be launched several hundred feet into the air during an eight-minute firework display. 


While the method of spreading ashes with explosives is certainly creative, Greenlawn's methods have garnered mostly positive reactions; many describe it as “the coolest thing they’ve ever seen.” The Firework Memorials range in price from an affordable rate of $300 for the “Sensational Celebration” to as high as $10,000 for the “Ultimate Goodbye.”

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Antarctic Explorer’s Journal Found In Melting Ice ~ Smithsonian Video


A snapshot of the failed Terra Nova expedition of 1910

George Murray Levick served as a photographer, zoologist and surgeon with the North Party

smithsonian.com
October 24, 2014

Every summer the thick Antarctic ice melts just a little bit, and the coursing water digs channels into the ice. This past summer, says Lizzie Meek with the Antarctic Heritage Trust in New Zealand, this melting ice unveiled a treasured: the lost journal of Antarctic explorer George Murray Levick.

Picked out from the ice as a clump of soaked paper, conservationists have now been able to reconstruct and digitize the lost notebook, which was carried by one of the team that set out on Robert Falcon Scott's failed Terra Nova expedition.

“Levick was a part of Scott’s 1910-1913 expedition and a member of the Northern Party,” says a release from the Antarctic Heritage Trust (New Zealand).

Members of Scott's Party
The notebook contains his pencil notes detailing the date, subjects and exposure details for the photographs he took during 1911 while at Cape Adare before undergoing a harsh winter in an ice cave on Inexpressible Island.
On the Terra Nova mission, from 1910 to 1913, Scott lost his life in his bid to reach the South Pole. Levick survived, says the trust, going on to found the British Schools Exploring Society.

Click to zoom

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SaLuSa 24 October 2014

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Galactic Federation of Light SaLuSa October 24 2014

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Sharing A New Place And Time In San Jose

Sharing A New Place And Time In San Josewww.themasterteacher.tv

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Partial Solar Eclipse Thursday ~ Next Eclipse Not Until 2017


This gives you an idea of how much of the sun will
This chart will give you an idea of how much of the sun will be blocked by the moon at the height of the eclipse, depending on where you live. (Photo: Doyle Rice and Frank Pompa, USA TODAY; Source: NASA)
 
Excerpt from usatoday.com

Don't forget to look up Thursday.

In the afternoon, a partial solar eclipse — where the moon covers a part of the sun — will be visible across much of the USA, barring any pesky clouds that could block the show. 

The eclipse will occur over most of North America — except for a small slice of eastern Canada and eastern New England, said meteorologist Joe Rao of Space.com.


In most of the eastern half of the USA and Canada, the eclipse will still be in progress at sunset — offering dramatic views if you can find a low western horizon, according to Sky and Telescope. In New York City, the eclipse starts at 5:49 p.m. ET and will last until the sun sets at 6:03 p.m. ET.

However, "people who live east of a line running from roughly Quebec City to Montauk Point, N.Y., will miss out on the solar show, since the sun will set before the dark disc of the moon begins to encroach upon it," Rao said.


During a solar eclipse, the sun, moon and Earth form a nearly straight line, with the moon in the middle. The moon temporarily blocks the sun in select areas on Earth.
Unless you use a special filter, such as welder's glasses, never look directly at the sun during the eclipse, or at any time for that matter. Universe Today warns that dangerous ultraviolet and infrared light focused on your retinas will damage your vision for the rest of your life.

Your camera also needs a special filter in order to photograph the eclipse.

The USA's next solar eclipse — which will be a total eclipse — won't occur until August 2017.

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Fish play for fun just like other animals, study says

Excerpt from techtimes.comYou may not be able to play a proper game of fetch with fish, but that doesn't mean they don't know how to have fun. It turns out that some species of fish play to have fun just like other animals, according to a new stud...

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Researchers make 32 differently-shaped DNA crystals – is this the future of nanotech?



Researchers have achieved 32 different–shaped crystal structures using the DNA–brick self–assembly method. (Photo : Harvard’s Wyss Institute)

Excerpt from
zmescience.com 

A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering demonstrated the latest advances in programmable DNA self-assembly by crystallizing 32 structures with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features. The DNA crystals could potentially be used as the basis of a programmable material platform that would allow scientists to build extremely precise and complex structures rivaling the complexity of many molecular machines we see in nature – all from the bottom up!

Nanotechnology like Lego

For the past twenty years or so, there’s been a lot of interest shown into designing large DNA crystals of various desired shapes by exploiting DNA’s inherent ability to self-assemble. We’re recently beginning to see the fruits of this labor, first in 2012 when the same team described their “DNA-brick self-assembly” method that allowed them to build more than 100 3D complex nanostructures about the size of viruses. The 32 designs reported in this latest research are 1000 times larger, close to the size of a speck of dust, which makes them closer to applicable scale where they can be used practically.

With conventional methods of DNA assembly, the resulting design tends to become more and more imperfect as you scale the design because at each step there’s a risk of error. The technique developed at Harvard is different because since it uses short, synthetic strands of DNA that work like interlocking Lego® bricks to build complex structures – it’s a modular design. Each structure first starts off as a computer model of a molecular cube (the master canvas), then individual DNA bricks are removed or added independently until a desired shape is met. These bricks bind to as many as four neighboring strands or bricks. Thus, two bricks connect to one another at a 90-degree angle to form a 3D shape, just like a pair of two-stud Lego bricks. Each individual brick is coded in such a way that they self-assemble in a desired 3-D shape. What’s fantastic is that this method allows for intricate shapes to built on an extremely tiny scale opening up a slew of applications. For instance, a cube built up from 1,000 such bricks (10 by 10 by 10) measures just 25 nanometers in width – thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair!
“Therein lies the key distinguishing feature of our design strategy—its modularity,” said co-lead author Yonggang Ke, Ph.D., formerly a Wyss Institute Postdoctoral Fellow and now an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University. “The ability to simply add or remove pieces from the master canvas makes it easy to create virtually any design.”

Precision controlled DNA

Most importantly, this modularity allows precision control of the structure’s depth. This is the first time that anyone has been able to design crystal depth with nanometer precision, up to 80 nm, as opposed to  two-dimensional DNA lattices which are typically single-layer structures with only 2 nm depth.
“DNA crystals are attractive for nanotechnology applications because they are comprised of repeating structural units that provide an ideal template for scalable design features”, said co-lead author graduate student Luvena Ong.

 “Peng’s team is using the DNA-brick self-assembly method to build the foundation for the new landscape of DNA nanotechnology at an impressive pace,” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D. “What have been mere visions of how the DNA molecule could be used to advance everything from the semiconductor industry to biophysics are fast becoming realities.”

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