Tag: picking (page 1 of 2)

Mira from the Pleiadian High Council – November 03-2016

View Article Here   Read More

Galactic Federation of Light Sheldan Nidle August 5 2015

View Article Here   Read More

13 Things Anyone Who Loves A Highly Sensitive Person Should Know

Excerpt from huffingtonpost.com When I was in kindergarten, a boy in my class tossed my favorite book over our elementary school fence. I remember crying profusely, not because I was sad to see it go, but because I was so furious that he was s...

View Article Here   Read More

Seattle Company Raises Minimum Wage to $70,000 a Year For All Employees!






Excerpt from nytimes.com

The idea began percolating, said Dan Price, the founder of Gravity Payments, after he read an article on happiness. It showed that, for people who earn less than about $70,000, extra money makes a big difference in their lives.

His idea bubbled into reality on Monday afternoon, when Mr. Price surprised his 120-person staff by announcing that he planned over the next three years to raise the salary of even the lowest-paid clerk, customer service representative and salesman to a minimum of $70,000.

“Is anyone else freaking out right now?” Mr. Price asked after the clapping and whooping died down into a few moments of stunned silence. “I’m kind of freaking out.”

If it’s a publicity stunt, it’s a costly one. Mr. Price, who started the Seattle-based credit-card payment processing firm in 2004 at the age of 19, said he would pay for the wage increases by cutting his own salary from nearly $1 million to $70,000 and using 75 to 80 percent of the company’s anticipated $2.2 million in profit this year.

Employees reacting to the news. The average salary at Gravity Payments had been $48,000 year. Credit Matthew Ryan Williams for The New York Times

The paychecks of about 70 employees will grow, with 30 ultimately doubling their salaries, according to Ryan Pirkle, a company spokesman. The average salary at Gravity is $48,000 year.

Mr. Price’s small, privately owned company is by no means a bellwether, but his unusual proposal does speak to an economic issue that has captured national attention: The disparity between the soaring pay of chief executives and that of their employees.

The United States has one of the world’s largest pay gaps, with chief executives earning nearly 300 times what the average worker makes, according to some economists’ estimates. That is much higher than the 20-to-1 ratio recommended by Gilded Age magnates like J. Pierpont Morgan and the 20th century management visionary Peter Drucker.

“The market rate for me as a C.E.O. compared to a regular person is ridiculous, it’s absurd,” said Mr. Price, who said his main extravagances were snowboarding and picking up the bar bill. He drives a 12-year-old Audi, which he received in a barter for service from the local dealer.

“As much as I’m a capitalist, there is nothing in the market that is making me do it,” he said, referring to paying wages that make it possible for his employees to go after the American dream, buy a house and pay for their children’s education.

Under a financial overhaul passed by Congress in 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission was supposed to require all publicly held companies to disclose the ratio of C.E.O. pay to the median pay of all other employees, but it has so far failed to put it in effect. Corporate executives have vigorously opposed the idea, complaining it would be cumbersome and costly to implement.

Mr. Price started the company, which processed $6.5 billion in transactions for more than 12,000 businesses last year, in his dorm room at Seattle Pacific University with seed money from his older brother. The idea struck him a few years earlier when he was playing in a rock band at a local coffee shop. The owner started having trouble with the company that was processing credit card payments and felt ground down by the large fees charged.

When Mr. Price looked into it for her, he realized he could do it more cheaply and efficiently with better customer service.

The entrepreneurial spirit was omnipresent where he grew up in rural southwestern Idaho, where his family lived 30 miles from the closest grocery store and he was home-schooled until the age of 12. When one of Mr. Price’s four brothers started a make-your-own baseball card business, 9-year-old Dan went on a local radio station to make a pitch: “Hi. I’m Dan Price. I’d like to tell you about my brother’s business, Personality Plus.”

His father, Ron Price, is a consultant and motivational speaker who has written his own book on business leadership.

Dan Price came close to closing up shop himself in 2008 when the recession sent two of his biggest clients into bankruptcy, eliminating 20 percent of his revenue in the space of two weeks. He said the firm managed to struggle through without layoffs or raising prices. His staff, most of them young, stuck with him.

Aryn Higgins at work at Gravity Payments in Seattle. She and her co-workers are going to receive significant pay raises. Credit Matthew Ryan Williams for The New York Times

Mr. Price said he wasn’t seeking to score political points with his plan. From his friends, he heard stories of how tough it was to make ends meet even on salaries that were still well-above the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour.

“They were walking me through the math of making 40 grand a year,” he said, then describing a surprise rent increase or nagging credit card debt.

“I hear that every single week,” he added. “That just eats at me inside.”

Mr. Price said he wanted to do something to address the issue of inequality, although his proposal “made me really nervous” because he wanted to do it without raising prices for his customers or cutting back on service.

Of all the social issues that he felt he was in a position to do something about as a business leader, “that one seemed like a more worthy issue to go after.”

He said he planned to keep his own salary low until the company earned back the profit it had before the new wage scale went into effect.

Hayley Vogt, a 24-year-old communications coordinator at Gravity who earns $45,000, said, “I’m completely blown away right now.” She said she has worried about covering rent increases and a recent emergency room bill.

“Everyone is talking about this $15 minimum wage in Seattle and it’s nice to work someplace where someone is actually doing something about it and not just talking about it,” she said.

The happiness research behind Mr. Price’s announcement on Monday came from Angus Deaton and Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel Prize-winning psychologist. They found that what they called emotional well-being — defined as “the emotional quality of an individual’s everyday experience, the frequency and intensity of experiences of joy, stress, sadness, anger, and affection that make one’s life pleasant or unpleasant” — rises with income, but only to a point. And that point turns out to be about $75,000 a year.

Of course, money above that level brings pleasures — there’s no denying the delights of a Caribbean cruise or a pair of diamond earrings — but no further gains on the emotional well-being scale.
As Mr. Kahneman has explained it, income above the threshold doesn’t buy happiness, but a lack of money can deprive you of it.
Phillip Akhavan, 29, earns $43,000 working on the company’s merchant relations team. “My jaw just dropped,” he said. “This is going to make a difference to everyone around me.”

At that moment, no Princeton researchers were needed to figure out he was feeling very happy.

View Article Here   Read More

NASA’s Plan to Give the Moon a Moon


arm-capture_0




Excerpt from wired.com

It sounds almost like a late ’90s sci-fi flick: NASA sends a spacecraft to an asteroid, plucks a boulder off its surface with a robotic claw, and brings it back in orbit around the moon. Then, brave astronaut heroes go and study the space rock up close—and bring samples back to Earth.
Except it’s not a movie: That’s the real-life idea for the Asteroid Redirect Mission, which NASA announced today. Other than simply being an awesome space version of the claw arcade game (you know you really wanted that stuffed Pikachu), the mission will let NASA test technology and practice techniques needed for going to Mars.
The mission, which will cost up to $1.25 billion, is slated to launch in December 2020. It will take about two years to reach the asteroid (the most likely candidate is a quarter-mile-wide rock called 2008 EV5). The spacecraft will spend up to 400 days there, looking for a good boulder. After picking one—maybe around 13 feet in diameter—it will bring the rock over to the moon. In 2025, astronauts will fly NASA’s still-to-be-built Orion to dock with the asteroid-carrying spacecraft and study the rock up close.
Although the mission would certainly give scientists an up-close opportunity to look at an asteroid, its main purpose is as a testing ground for a Mars mission. The spacecraft will test a solar electronic propulsion system, which uses the power from solar panels to pump out charged particles to provide thrust. It’s slower than conventional rockets, but a lot more efficient. You can’t lug a lot of rocket fuel to Mars.
Overall, the mission gives NASA a chance at practicing precise navigation and maneuvering techniques that they’ll need to master for a Mars mission. Such a trip will also require a lot more cargo, so grabbing and maneuvering a big space rock is good practice. Entering lunar orbit and docking with another spacecraft would also be helpful, as the orbit might be a place for a deep-space habitat, a rendezvous point for astronauts to pick up cargo or stop on their way to Mars.
And—you knew this part was coming, Armageddon fans—the mission might teach NASA something about preventing an asteroid from striking Earth. After grabbing the boulder, the spacecraft will orbit the asteroid. With the added heft from the rock, the spacecraft’s extra gravity would nudge the asteroid, creating a slight change in trajectory that NASA could measure from Earth. “We’re not talking about a large deflection here,” says Robert Lightfoot, an associate administrator at NASA. But the idea is that a similar technique could push a threatening asteroid off a collision course with Earth.
NASA chose this mission concept over one that would’ve bagged an entire asteroid. In that plan, the spacecraft would’ve captured the space rock by enclosing it in a giant, flexible container. The claw concept won out because its rendezvous and soft-landing on the asteroid will allow NASA to test and practice more capabilities in preparation for a Mars mission, Lightfoot says. The claw would’ve also given more chances at grabbing a space rock, whereas it was all or nothing with the bag idea. “It’s a one-shot deal,” he says. “It is what it is when we get there.” But the claw concept offers some choices. “I’ve got three to five opportunities to pull one of the boulders off,” he says. Not bad odds. Better than winning that Pikachu

View Article Here   Read More

This Alien Color Catalog May Help Us Spot Life on Other Planets






Excerpt from smithsonianmag.com


In the hunt for alien life, our first glimpse of extraterrestrials may be in the rainbow of colors seen coming from the surface of an exoplanet.

That's the deceptively simple idea behind a study led by Siddharth Hegde at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany. Seen from light-years away, plants on Earth give our planet a distinctive hue in the near-infrared, a phenomenon called red edge. That's because the chlorophyll in plants absorbs most visible light waves but starts to become transparent to wavelengths on the redder end of the spectrum. An extraterrestrial looking at Earth through a telescope could match this reflected color with the presence of oxygen in our atmosphere and conclude there is life here.


exoplanets palette
Eight of the 137 microorganism samples used to measure biosignatures for the catalog of reflection signatures of Earth life forms. In each panel, the top is a regular photograph of the sample and the bottom is a micrograph, a version of the top image zoomed-in 400 times.



Plants, though, have only been around for 500 million years—a relative blip in our planet's 4.6-billion-year history. Microbes dominated the scene for some 2.5 billion years in the past, and some studies suggest they will rule the Earth again for much of its future. So Hegde and his team gathered 137 species of microorganisms that all have different pigments and that reflect light in specific ways. By building up a library of the microbes' reflectance spectra—the types of colors those microscopic critters reflect from a distance—scientists examining the light from habitable exoplanets can have a plethora of possible signals to search for, the team argues this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"No one had looked at the wide range of diverse life on Earth and asked how we could potentially spot such life on other planets, and include life from extreme environments on Earth that could be the 'norm' on other planets," Lisa Kaltenegger, a co-author on the study, says via email. "You can use it to model an Earth that is different and has different widespread biota and look how it would appear to our telescopes."

To make sure they got enough diversity, the researchers looked at temperate-dwelling microbes as well as creatures that live in extreme environments like deserts, mineral springs, hydrothermal vents or volcanically active areas.

While it might seem that alien life could take a huge variety of forms—for instance, something like the silicon-based Horta from Star Trek—it's possible to narrow things down if we restrict the search to life as we know it. First, any life-form that is carbon-based and uses water as a solvent isn't going to like the short wavelengths of light far in the ultraviolet, because this high-energy UV can damage organic molecules. At the other end of the spectrum, any molecule that alien plants (or their analogues) use to photosynthesize won't be picking up light that's too far into the infrared, because there's not enough energy at those longer wavelengths.

In addition, far-infrared light is hard to see through an Earth-like atmosphere because the gases block a lot of these waves, and whatever heat the planet emits will drown out any signal from surface life. That means the researchers restricted their library to the reflected colors we can see when looking at wavelengths in the visible part of the spectrum, the longest wavelength UV and short-wave infrared.

The library won't be much use if we can't see the planets' surfaces in the first place, and that's where the next generation of telescopes comes in, Kaltenegger says. The James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for launch in 2018, should be able to see the spectra of relatively small exoplanet atmospheres and help scientists work out their chemical compositions, but it won't be able to see any reflected spectra from material at the surface. Luckily, there are other planned telescopes that should be able to do the job. The European Extremely Large Telescope, a 40-meter instrument in Chile, will be complete by 2022. And NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, which is funded and in its design stages, should be up and running by the mid-2020s.

Another issue is whether natural geologic or chemical processes could look like life and create a false signal. So far the pigments from life-forms look a lot different from those reflected by minerals, but the team hasn't examined all the possibilities either, says Kaltenegger. They hope to do more testing in the future as they build up the digital library, which is now online and free for anyone to explore at biosignatures.astro.cornell.edu.

View Article Here   Read More

Planck telescope puts new datestamp on first stars


Polarisation of the sky
Planck has mapped the delicate polarisation of the CMB across the entire sky



Excerpt from bbc.com

Scientists working on Europe's Planck satellite say the first stars lit up the Universe later than previously thought.

The team has made the most precise map of the "oldest light" in the cosmos.

Earlier observations of this radiation had suggested the first generation of stars were bursting into life by about 420 million years after the Big Bang.

Planck's data indicates this great ignition was well established by some 560 million years after it all began.

"This difference of 140 million years might not seem that significant in the context of the 13.8-billion-year history of the cosmos, but proportionately it's actually a very big change in our understanding of how certain key events progressed at the earliest epochs," said Prof George Efstathiou, one of the leaders of the Planck Science Collaboration.

Subtle signal

The assessment is based on studies of the "afterglow" of the Big Bang, the ancient light called the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), which still washes over the Earth today.
Prof George Efstathiou: "We don't need more complicated explanations"

The European Space Agency's (Esa) Planck satellite mapped this "fossil" between 2009 and 2013.

It contains a wealth of information about early conditions in the Universe, and can even be used to work out its age, shape and do an inventory of its contents.

Scientists can also probe it for very subtle "distortions" that tell them about any interactions the CMB has had on its way to us.

Forging elements

One of these would have been imprinted when the infant cosmos underwent a major environmental change known as re-ionisation.

Prof Richard McMahon: "The two sides of the bridge now join"
It is when the cooling neutral hydrogen gas that dominated the Universe in the aftermath of the Big Bang was then re-energised by the ignition of the first stars.

These hot giants would have burnt brilliant but brief lives, producing the very first heavy elements. But they would also have "fried" the neutral gas around them - ripping electrons off the hydrogen protons.

And it is the passage of the CMB through this maze of electrons and protons that would have resulted in it picking up a subtle polarisation.

ImpressionImpression: The first stars would have been unwieldy behemoths that burnt brief but brilliant lives


The Planck team has now analysed this polarisation in fine detail and determined it to have been generated at 560 million years after the Big Bang.

The American satellite WMAP, which operated in the 2000s, made the previous best estimate for the peak of re-ionisation at 420 million years. 

The problem with that number was that it sat at odds with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the early Universe.

Hubble could not find stars and galaxies in sufficient numbers to deliver the scale of environmental change at the time when WMAP suggested it was occurring.

Planck's new timing "effectively solves the conflict," commented Prof Richard McMahon from Cambridge University, UK.

"We had two groups of astronomers who were basically working on different sides of the problem. The Planck people came at it from the Big Bang side, while those of us who work on galaxies came at it from the 'now side'. 

"It's like a bridge being built over a river. The two sides do now join where previously we had a gap," he told BBC News.

That gap had prompted scientists to invoke complicated scenarios to initiate re-ionisation, including the possibility that there might have been an even earlier population of giant stars or energetic black holes. Such solutions are no longer needed.

No-one knows the exact timing of the very first individual stars. All Planck does is tell us when large numbers of these stars had gathered into galaxies of sufficient strength to alter the cosmic environment. 

By definition, this puts the ignition of the "founding stars" well before 560 million years after the Big Bang. Quite how far back in time, though, is uncertain. Perhaps, it was as early as 200 million years. It will be the job of the next generation of observatories like Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, to try to find the answer.

JWSTBeing built now: The James Webb telescope will conduct a survey of the first galaxies and their stars
line
The history of the Universe

Graphic of the history of time
  • Planck's CMB studies indicate the Big Bang was 13.8bn years ago
  • The CMB itself can be thought of as the 'afterglow' of the Big Bang
  • It spreads across the cosmos some 380,000 years after the Big Bang
  • This is when the conditions cool to make neutral hydrogen atoms
  • The period before the first stars is often called the 'Dark Ages'
  • When the first stars ignite, they 'fry' the neutral gas around them
  • These giants also forge the first heavy elements in big explosions
  • 'First Light', or 'Cosmic Renaissance', is a key epoch in history
line

The new Planck result is contained in a raft of new papers just posted on the Esa website. 

These papers accompany the latest data release from the satellite that can now be used by the wider scientific community, not just collaboration members.
Dr Andrew Jaffe: "The simplest models for inflation are ruled out"
Two years ago, the data dump largely concerned interpretations of the CMB based on its temperature profile. It is the CMB's polarisation features that take centre-stage this time.
It was hoped that Planck might find direct evidence in the CMB's polarisation for inflation - the super-rapid expansion of space thought to have occurred just fractions of a second after the Big Bang. This has not been possible. But all the Planck data - temperature and polarisation information - is consistent with that theory, and the precision measurements mean new, tighter constraints have been put on the likely scale of the inflation signal, which other experiments continue to chase.
What is clear from the Planck investigation is that the simplest models for how the super-rapid expansion might have worked are probably no longer tenable, suggesting some exotic physics will eventually be needed to explain it.
"We're now being pushed into a parameter space we didn't expect to be in," said collaboration scientist Dr Andrew Jaffe from Imperial College, UK. "That's OK. We like interesting physics; that's why we're physicists, so there's no problem with that. It's just we had this naïve expectation that the simplest answer would be right, and sometimes it just isn't."

View Article Here   Read More

7 Types of Non-Believers Who Don’t Need Religion

Valerie Tarico, AlterNetReligious labels help shore up identity. So what are some of the things non-believers can call themselves?Catholic, born-again, Reformed, Jew, Muslim, Shiite, Sunni, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist…religions give people labels. The downside can be tribalism, an assumption that insiders are better than outsiders, that they merit more compassion, integrity and generosity or even that violence toward “infidels” is acceptable. But the upside is that religious o [...]

View Article Here   Read More

What is Enlightenment?

Thomas Razzeto, GrahamHancock.comMy most passionate plea is for you to wake up to your true self as pure awareness. We have all heard it said that you are not a human being having a spiritual experience, but instead, you are a spiritual being having a human experience. Yet you are not a being of any kind, spiritual or physical. You are pure awareness! And most importantly, your awareness is the One Awareness – the Divine Awareness – and as such, it is the only reality tha [...]

View Article Here   Read More

7 Ways Cannabis Legalization Has Already Benefited Colorado

Jeff Roberts, Collective-EvolutionJanuary 1st 2014 saw the opening of the very first cannabis shop in Colorado as the cultivation, manufacture and sale of the controversial plant became fully legalized. Since then, the state has seen a lot of promising results.Laura Pegram of Drugpolicy.org wrote in her article, Six Months of Marijuana Sales: Positive Trends Emerge in Colorado, that “even the state’s Director of Marijuana Coordination was quick to note [...]

View Article Here   Read More

Write it off, or Write it On(e)?

When on the train to work this morning, and pondering over the article I posted earlier about writing for reality, another related topic surfaced in my mind: I've been ardently writing in my Diary these last nine years or so, but then this year, for...

View Article Here   Read More

Buffalo Diaries – Growth

Well, Little Hawk was intended for another. Welcome, to this new energy and I am honored to be able to pass on the information. It is a humbling experience to be in the presence of Creator and speak words on their behalf. Blessings to Little Hawk...

Today, the birds are back. They were conspicuously absent from the yard yesterday when I awoke and stepped outside for my morning tea. There was much to clear and shed light on yesterday, a darkness surrounding the outskirts of our presence. Much was illuminated and many discoveries made. Such is the nature of soul retrieval. When something is off, we go after it... Look for the source, so as to get the energy back and seal the crack. 
As the day progressed, my partner, Deva and I continued to stay present and alert, sensing the swirling fractals of experience and calling our power back from situations where it had been lost. We discovered what was needed and did the work, staying present for one another as the cords and attachments were released and all the black magic spells and curses were broken. I was working on healing a sense of betrayal and manipulation, forgiving and releasing more insight into the situation appeared as it was being released. I came to see the outcome of another’s will being expressed or projected onto me and my surroundings. It was palpable and very controlling, however subtly so. 

We contemplated obligation vs. highest good and what that meant, discovering the importance of remaining true to one’s Higher Consciousness. That is how we live. We listen, discern and move with Creator, staying aligned with and acting only upon those experiences that are for our highest good. When obligation comes in, resonating with such a different frequency, what does one do? It causes friction, and one tends to suborn their Higher Consciousness. It is true, what is in one’s highest good may not be the same for another and true brothers and sisters on the path will understand that. Clear, compassionate communication is necessary in these situations and much Love and Kindness; all must allow each to be and express themselves to a collaborative resolution. 

This is what Love does... 

Love is acceptance and gratitude, deep resonant Truth in the face of all. Love restores everything to the natural order and perfect balance with all Creation. Love allows all to be, with forgiveness and release. 

The birds returned again, a big flock of them are in the yard right now! Singing and talking, they are picking away at the detritus in the yard, recycling energy for the natural order. Yay!!! Thank you, Creator! 

How does one carry the light that they are into the world? Shining so bright and standing in Truth can be intimidating and overpowering for others who may be facing their own challenges in expressing their own Light and Authenticity. What does one do? Is it appropriate to “tone it down” for the audience? I think not... I compromised my energy many times in my life and all it did was strip me of my power and suborned my Higher Consciousness. I did what was other than for my highest good, I suppressed my expression and that took me down other inauthentic timelines of experience. 

I have spent the last three years healing from this experience and come to know that I must continually strive to be the very best human being I can possibly be... I must follow my Higher Self, allowing the guides and the rhythm of the Universe to lead the way. In restoring balance to myself and acting with integrity, I authentically move through each of life’s experiences with Love and Kindness. This has created a peaceful energy and sanctuary around me. It works!

It is apparent that it is working because my life is filled with abundance... Love, Health, Wealth and Happiness. The natural order of All that Is and I am in flow with it in my life. And it shows... Our light shines bright, we are in right relations, we are happy and joyous. We dance, we sing and we celebrate. We are free.

And so I have come to see that suppressing energy for any reason is other than the light. It is manipulative and controlling. We are all come to this Earth to express Love and Kindness; to be one with Creator in physical form. As this happens, as our beingness comes into alignment with all Creation we have access to vast resources. We are in flow with all of the Universe and the order, once restored, brings us to the right place at the right time and there is nothing to do, but just be. 

This was an uncomfortable feeling for me when I was first starting out... Believing in myself enough to flow, rather than control, manipulate and strategize. I remember that and understand why it is uncomfortable. But I sit here now and say, please work with those feelings so as to allow the Light that you are to shine. You are a Light Being in human form and the planet is in transition. We are evolving into higher frequencies of Light as foretold by many far and wide. 

So, it’s uncomfortable... Many things in this life have been uncomfortable and yet, I survived and got better at it... When learning to walk as a child, I tried, toppled over, laughed and got back up again. This is the experience... We are learning to walk again before we can fly. We are learning to release all the holds of the old ways to create something so new as to have never been seen before. All the great thinkers and sages of their day were looked at with suspicion. The masses viewed the outliers with separation and ignorance. They were not having the same experience. The visionaries were out in front, leading the way... the scouts for the new route, we are testing paths of consciousness to determine their efficacy towards cultivating the Loving Timeline. 

I am seeing a rewriting of the human story. The mythology of the past has become far outdated and frankly has ceased to function for humanity today. We are in search of a new Hero’s Journey, as Joseph Campbell would say and I have come to see the Truth in this. There are many who are forging the way, releasing the traditions of the past, so as to have a greater clarity and ability to listen. We are dowsing the way, but must be crystal clear in our being to know the Truth. Every step along the way, a discovery of that to be release so the Journey can continue. 

We are here to bear witness to each other’s challenge and support and grow as we transmute the very foundation that reality has been created in. Those that are willing to postulate that there is something different and test the hypothesis are visionary beings in troubled times. They are out there and I commend their efforts. All of our efforts, during this time of transformation are necessary if we are to proceed onto the Loving Timeline. Much personal effort and growth mark the inspired one; they know it is difficult and never give up even though they may falter. 

And whatever place you are on your journey know that there is support all around you. You are one with all Creation and Creator is there for you.

We are here for each other to support one another when and how we can, to stay aligned to individual sovereignty and grow... always grow, the time for dallying on the trail is over. Constant forward movement as the frequency quickens we must learn to move faster than fast to stay in the flow. Light and Love are faster vibrations, follow them and leave the density behind. Release anything that is impeding the flow and sovereignty returns. Be in the Truth and all is revealed... 

I now take total personal responsibility for all my thoughts, words and actions I have created in any lifetime, any dimension or reality and in all forms of consciousness. I am the light of this body, the universal one, beyond the mind I am that complete radiant One.

I shine the brilliance of my Light and share my Love with all Creation, forgiving and releasing all the past I step into this moment, completely as I am...

Listening for the beat, I step into my frame and Dance...

Love and Kindness,
Marc

buffalodiaries.blogspot.com

View Article Here   Read More

Lyriad Meteor Shower Peaks on Earth Day April 22

Sorry this info is late..... 

Dré

"The best time to look will be between the time of moonset [between 1 and 2 a.m., local time] and dawn, and the best way to observe the show is to recline comfortably, facing anywhere from north to east and gazing nearly overhead," Cook said. news.nationalgeographic.com

Andrew Fazekas

for National Geographic News

Published April 19, 2010

For the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, nature will be setting off some fireworks, with the peak of the annual Lyrid meteor shower arriving on April 22.

While the Lyrids might not be cosmic celebrities like August's showy Perseids, the April meteor shower has been known to offer up a surprise or two for sky-watchers

(Related: "Comet 'Shower' Killed Ice Age Mammals?")

"Although the Lyrids have been observed since 687 B.C., the behavior of the shower from year to year is unpredictable," said Anthony Cook, an astronomer for the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.

"An average Lyrid shower produces between 10 and 20 meteors per hour, but occasionally these rates increase to 90 per hour," Cook said. "In 1803 the shower produced about a thousand meteors per hour"—just enough to qualify as a meteor storm.

How to See the Lyrid Meteors

This year, Lyrid meteor activity began picking up on April 16, and the shower will run until April 25.

The Earth Day peak will actually come in the early morning hours of April 22, after the first quarter moon has sunk below the horizon, leaving dark skies. (Test your lunar smarts with our moon quiz.)

"The best time to look will be between the time of moonset [between 1 and 2 a.m., local time] and dawn, and the best way to observe the show is to recline comfortably, facing anywhere from north to east and gazing nearly overhead," Cook said.

"The best location is a region far from urban light pollution with a fairly open horizon."

Lyrids to Be a Sprinkle or a Storm?

The Lyrids' "shooting stars" will appear to radiate from around the brilliant star Vega in the shower's namesake constellation Lyra.

Vega now shines nearly overhead in the predawn hours for stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere skies, the Lyrids will produce just a sprinkling of meteors.

As with other annual meteor showers, the Lyrids are thought to be caused by debris left over from a passing comet. When Earth passes through the trail of particles—most no bigger than grains of sand—the tiny rocks burn up in our atmosphere, creating bright streaks.

(Related: "'Major,' Green Meteor Lights Midwest Night Sky," with video.)

The Lyrids have been linked to the periodic comet Thatcher, which has an orbit that's skewed nearly perpendicular to the plane of the solar system, the tabletop-like plane along which the planets orbit.

The dearth of planets along the comet's path means that its debris trail stays relatively stable, which is most likely why the Lyrids have been a reliable meteor shower for centuries.

But sometimes Earth passes through a particularly dense clump of cometary leftovers, and that's when meteor rates skyrocket.

So are sky-watchers this year in for a sprinkle or a storm?

"The only way to know what the Lyrids have in store for you," Cook said, "is to go outside and observe them."

View Article Here   Read More

Older posts

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License
.
unless otherwise marked.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy



Up ↑