Tag: state (page 23 of 74)

Time travel and teleporting ‘a reality for today’s children’

Excerpt from telegraph.co.uk

By Rhiannon Williams


Travelling through time, invisibility cloaks and teleporting could all happen within today's children's lifetimes, experts have predicted



Children could be travelling between centuries as soon as the year 2100, while teleportation could become a regular occurence by around 2080, professors from Imperial College London and the University of Glasgow have said. 
"The good thing about teleportation is that there is no fundamental law telling us that it cannot be done and with technical advances I would estimate teleportation that we see in the films will be with us by 2080,” said Dr. Mary Jacquiline Romero from the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow. 
“Teleporting a person, atom by atom, will be very difficult and is of course a physicist's way, but perhaps developments in chemistry or molecular biology will allow us to do it more quickly. The good thing about teleportation is that there is no fundamental law telling us that it cannot be done and with technical advances I would estimate teleportation that we see in the films will be with us by 2080,” she said. 
“Time travel to the future has already been achieved, but only in tiny amounts. The record is 0.02 seconds set by cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev. Whilst that doesn't sound too impressive, it does show that time travel to the future is possible and that the amount of time travel couldn't be far greater," he argued. 

“If you travelled through space on a big loop at 10 per cent the speed of light for what seemed to you like six months, approximately six months and one day would have passed on Earth. You'd have time travelled a day into the future. Travel at the same speed for 10 years and you'll time travel nearly three weeks into the future. I would say we are looking at 2100 as a very optimistic timescale for travelling weeks into the future.” 

Invisibility cloaks, as featured in Harry Potter, could be "entirely feasible" within the next 10 to 20 years, Professor Chris Phillips, Professor of Experimental Solid State Physics at Imperial College London said. 



Harry tests his invisibility cloak for the first time


“One way to create an ‘invisibility cloak’ is to use adaptive camouflage, which involves taking a film of the background of an object or person and projecting it onto the front to give the illusion of vanishing, " he added. 

"We’re actually not that far away from this becoming a reality – rudimentary technology versions of this have already been created – but the main problem is that the fibre-like structures in the adaptive camouflage need to be so tightly woven that it’s incredibly labour intensive. With developments such as 3D printing allowing us to create previously impossible materials, it’s entirely feasible that we could see a ‘Harry Potter’-like invisibility cloak within the next 10 to 20 years.” 

The research was conducted by the Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Fair, which compared the predictions of scientists to that of a panel of 11-16 year-olds. 

While their speculation was largely in line with the experts' expectations, the children thought time travel could be feasible by 2078. They also dramatically overestimated when they might be able to become space tourists - anticipating it might take another 30 years, when commercial space flights are due to launch in 2015.

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Why France has a team of UFO hunters

A drawing from the files at the French UFO departmentExcerpt from BBCBy Chris Bockman Thousands of UFO sightings are reported every year but not many countries are willing to spend money investigating them - there is just one dedicated state-run tea...

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Amazon, Google, IBM & Microsoft Want to Store Your Genome


Excerpt from  technologyreview.com


By Antonio Regalado

 For $25 a year, Google will keep a copy of any genome in the cloud.

Google is approaching hospitals and universities with a new pitch. Have genomes? Store them with us.

The search giant’s first product for the DNA age is Google Genomics, a cloud computing service that it launched last March but went mostly unnoticed amid a barrage of high profile R&D announcements from Google...

Google Genomics could prove more significant than any of these moonshots. Connecting and comparing genomes by the thousands, and soon by the millions, is what’s going to propel medical discoveries for the next decade. The question of who will store the data is already a point of growing competition between Amazon, Google, IBM, and Microsoft.

Google began work on Google Genomics 18 months ago, meeting with scientists and building an interface, or API, that lets them move DNA data into its server farms and do experiments there using the same database technology that indexes the Web and tracks billions of Internet users.

This flow of data is smaller than what is routinely handled by large Internet companies (over two months, Broad will produce the equivalent of what gets uploaded to YouTube in one day) but it exceeds anything biologists have dealt with. That’s now prompting a wide effort to store and access data at central locations, often commercial ones. The National Cancer Institute said last month that it would pay $19 million to move copies of the 2.6 petabyte Cancer Genome Atlas into the cloud. Copies of the data, from several thousand cancer patients, will reside both at Google Genomics and in Amazon’s data centers.

The idea is to create “cancer genome clouds” where scientists can share information and quickly run virtual experiments as easily as a Web search, says Sheila Reynolds, a research scientist at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle. “Not everyone has the ability to download a petabyte of data, or has the computing power to work on it,” she says.

Also speeding the move of DNA data to the cloud has been a yearlong price war between Google and Amazon. Google says it now charges about $25 a year to store a genome, and more to do computations on it. Scientific raw data representing a single person’s genome is about 100 gigabytes in size, although a polished version of a person’s genetic code is far smaller, less than a gigabyte. That would cost only $0.25 cents a year.


The bigger point, he says, is that medicine will soon rely on a kind of global Internet-of-DNA which doctors will be able to search. “Our bird’s eye view is that if I were to get lung cancer in the future, doctors are going to sequence my genome and my tumor’s genome, and then query them against a database of 50 million other genomes,” he says. “The result will be ‘Hey, here’s the drug that will work best for you.’ ”


At Google, Glazer says he began working on Google Genomics as it became clear that biology was going to move from “artisanal to factory-scale data production.” He started by teaching himself genetics, taking an online class, Introduction to Biology, taught by Broad’s chief, Eric Lander. He also got his genome sequenced and put it on Google’s cloud.

Glazer wouldn’t say how large Google Genomics is or how many customers it has now, but at least 3,500 genomes from public projects are already stored on Google’s servers. He also says there’s no link, as of yet, between Google’s cloud and its more speculative efforts in health care, like the company Google started this year, called Calico, to investigate how to extend human lifespans. “What connects them is just a growing realization that technology can advance the state of the art in life sciences,” says Glazer.

Datta says some Stanford scientists have started using a Google database system, BigQuery, that Glazer’s team made compatible with genome data. It was developed to analyze large databases of spam, web documents, or of consumer purchases. But it can also quickly perform the very large experiments comparing thousands, or tens of thousands, of people’s genomes that researchers want to try. “Sometimes they want to do crazy things, and you need scale to do that,” says Datta. “It can handle the scale genetics can bring, so it’s the right technology for a new problem.”

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Top Chemical Evolutionary Theorist Now Rejects Theory of Evolution

Dean Kenyon, Professor of Biology San Francisco State University

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Quantum Mechanics Breakthrough Enables Photon Interaction ~ May lead to computer ‘light’ chips ~ Greg Giles

Artist's conception of a computer chip made of light In quantum mechanics, photons cannot interact with each other in free space. Light waves have only freely passed through each other without changing their state or path, until now. Vienna Univ...

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Ramblings of an Insomniac Sagittarius ~ Virtual Reality & the Light at the End of the Tunnel ~ By Greg Giles





Ramblings of an Insomniac Sagittarius


So what's keeping me up tonight?


Well, it's this light; you know the one, the bright light at the end of the tunnel that so many report after a near-death experience. I think about that light a lot, and it's no wonder really as, although our world is full of countless mysteries, there aren’t too many that are as incredible to think about then the question of life after death. One of my favorite pastimes is to try to picture just what it is exactly that awaits us at the end of our current lives, and at the end of that lighted tunnel. 


Firstly, let's take a cursory look at the odds that there is something for us after this lifetime. At minimum it's a 50-50 shot, as either there is something after here or there isn't. But we can go beyond that and adjust those odds a bit by adding variables to our equation.

Let's consider the countless reports of an afterlife witnessed during a near-death experience. If just one of these reports is accurate-just one mind you, then the odds that something awaits us after this lifetime shifts dramatically, wouldn't you say?


Aside from that, we can add as a variable the incredible long shots necessary for life as we know it to come into being. These long shots certainly shift our odds considerably, and I must say it’s quite refreshing and enjoyable to stand on the short-shot side for once.

Another piece of evidence we would be remiss not to examine is a piece of evidence that is certainly the largest and for me, the most obvious, yet I believe it is the single piece of evidence that is more commonly overlooked when examining the life after death question; our visible universe itself. Just think about it for a moment; does this incredible, remarkable, miraculous, gorgeous, mysterious and seemingly boundless kingdom resemble in any way an accident? Or does it resemble more a product of conscious and purposeful creation? 


When I look around, especially when I look up, I am left with absolutely no doubt that all and everything is a product of intelligent design. So for me, the odds are astoundingly good there awaits us something incredible, something miraculous, and for me, something so exciting to think about. I think a lot of us may lose sight of that sometimes.


So, what is it then that awaits us? Let's start off with what is, for me, but perhaps not you, the most hellish possibility. If the bright light at the end of the tunnel is a hospital delivery room and we are immediately born right back into this world, well then, I would have to say that all those biblical stories about hell are true. 


But moving on to more positive possibilities of the white light at the end of the tunnel, I feel a very good possibility would be that the white light that we are seeing is actually our eyes filling with light as we remove a virtual reality headset. You may feel that this is kind of an odd possibility, but I feel it is a very real possible that all of us are playing an Earth-sized virtual reality game, an MMORPG, or massively multiplayer online role-playing game, not unlike World of Warcraft. 
Playing World of Warcraft



Can you imagine that? Just imagine, at the end of your life here, you experience the sensation of someone somewhere helping you pull from your head a virtual reality headset as your eyes fill with the bright light of a room, possibly even your very own bedroom, somewhere, sometime. Where could that possibly be, and what can our reallives possibly be like?  


Just think about for a moment. If our lives are constructs of a super advanced virtual reality game, just imagine what our genuine reality could be like. It could be absolutely unidentifiable to the lives we are now living. We could be living eternal and incredible lives humans currently reserve only for gods. Wouldn't that be wonderful? Wouldn't that be miraculous? And I see all this as a very plausible possibility. I even see this possibility as the most plausible, as amazing as that may seem.  


Now, if we are currently living a reality that is completely removed from our true reality, then how would we have entered this virtual state? We must enter it somehow, and we aren’t getting hit over the head with a brick like in an Ignatz and Krazy Kat cartoon. No, there must be some kind of process we go through to enter this state of reality, and I feel it’s likely we utilize some kind of virtual reality technology, even if that technology is largely natural, meaning we utilize our minds more than we rely on technology. Nonetheless, I believe that we are using some kind of virtual reality to enter this reality, this MMORPG. 

Ignatz & Krazy Kat ~ Probably one of the reasons we are playing this virtual reality game


Just sitting here at the computer sharing my thoughts about this with you causes my mind to stir, and I see I’m going to be up very late tonight as I lie in bed pondering all of this, but I can't think of a better reason to miss a little sleep.

Greg Giles

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Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life
Brittany Maynard ~ Courtesy Brittany Maynard
Excerpt from People
by Nicole Weisensee Egan
Brittany Maynard, who became the public face of the controversial right-to-die movement over the last few weeks, ended her own life Saturday at her home in Portland, Oregon. She was 29.

"Goodbye to all my dear friends and family that I love. Today is the day I have chosen to pass away with dignity in the face of my terminal illness, this terrible brain cancer that has taken so much from me … but would have taken so much more," she wrote on Facebook. "The world is a beautiful place, travel has been my greatest teacher, my close friends and folks are the greatest givers. I even have a ring of support around my bed as I type … Goodbye world. Spread good energy. Pay it forward!"

Doctors told Maynard she had six months to live last spring after she was diagnosed with a likely stage 4 glioblastoma. She made headlines around the world when she announced she intended to die – under Oregon's Death with Dignity Act – by taking a fatal dose of barbiturates, prescribed to her by a doctor, when her suffering became too great.

"My glioblastoma is going to kill me and that's out of my control," she told PEOPLE last month. "I've discussed with many experts how I would die from it and it's a terrible, terrible way to die. So being able to choose to go with dignity is less terrifying."

On Oct. 6, she launched an online video campaign with Compassion & Choices, an end-of-life choice advocacy organization, to fight for expanding death-with-dignity laws nationwide.

"For people to argue against this choice for sick people really seems evil to me," she told PEOPLE. "They try to mix it up with suicide and that's really unfair, because there's not a single part of me that wants to die. But I am dying."

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life| Cancer, Health, Medicine, Real People Stories, Brittany Maynard
Brittany Maynard
Nigel Parry

A Heartbreaking Choice

Arriving at her decision was a gradual one, she said.

"It's not a decision you make one day and you snap your fingers," she told PEOPLE.

"Really, from the beginning, all the doctors said when you have a glioma you're going to die," she told PEOPLE. "You can just Google it. People don't survive this disease. Not yet."

After researching her options, she decided not to try chemotherapy or radiation.

"They didn't seem to make sense for me," she said, because of "the level of side effects I would suffer and it wouldn't save my life. I've been told pretty much no matter what, I'm going to die – and treatments would extend my life but affect the quality pretty negatively."

In June, she moved to Oregon with her husband, Dan Diaz, 43, her mother, Debbie Ziegler, 56 , and her stepfather, Gary Holmes, 72, so she could have access to the state's Death with Dignity Act, which allows physicians to prescribe life-ending medication to certain terminally ill patients.

"I still smile and laugh with my family and friends enough that it doesn't seem like the right time now," she said in the video recorded Oct. 13 and 14, "but it will come because I feel myself getting sicker; it's happening each week."

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life| Cancer, Health, Medicine, Real People Stories, Brittany Maynard
Brittany Maynard and Dan Diaz at Olympic National Park in Washington state in August
Courtesy Brittany Maynard

Her Final Months

Maynard spent the last months of her life making the most of the time she had left. She traveled to Alaska, British Columbia and Yellowstone National Park with her loved ones and explored more local attractions like Olympic National Park in Washington.

On Oct. 21, she and her family took a helicopter ride to the Grand Canyon, a place she'd been longing to see before she died.

"It was breathtakingly beautiful," she said in a statement.

The following morning, though, she had her "worst seizure" so far, she said: "The seizure was a harsh reminder that my symptoms continue to worsen as the tumor runs its course."

Maynard said she was deeply touched by the "outpouring of support" she got after going public with her diagnosis and her decision.

"I want to thank people for that, for the words of kindness, for the time they've taken in personal ways," she told PEOPLE.

"And then beyond that, to encourage people to make a difference," she said. "If they can relate to my story, if they agree with this issue on a philosophical level, to get out there and do what we need to do to make a change in this country."

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life| Cancer, Health, Medicine, Real People Stories, Brittany Maynard
Brittany Maynard and her mother, Debbie Ziegler, in Alaska in May
Courtesy Brittany Maynard


Maynard also talked to PEOPLE about her legacy.

"For me what matters most is the way I'm remembered by my family and my husband as a good woman who did my best to be a good wife and a good daughter," she said.

"Beyond that, getting involved with this campaign, I hope to be making a difference here," she said. "If I'm leaving a legacy, it's to change this health-care policy or be a part of this change of this health-care policy so it becomes available to all Americans. That would be an enormous contribution to make, even if I'm just a piece of it."

Before she died, Maynard asked her husband and her mother if they would carry on the work she started to get death with dignity passed in every state.

"I want to work on the cause," Ziegler told PEOPLE last month. "I have so much admiration for people who are terminally ill and just fight and fight. They are so dignified and brave. This is a different choice, but it is also brave and dignified."

She also shared with them her hopes and dreams for their future. Upstairs in the home she shares with her family are neatly wrapped Christmas and birthday gifts for her loved ones for the next year.

"She made it clear she wants me to live a good life," Ziegler says.

In her second video, Maynard, who is an only child, said she hoped her mother does not "break down" or "suffer from any kind of depression."

And for Diaz, "I hope he moves on and becomes a father," she said. "There's no part of me that wants him to live out the rest of his life just missing his wife."

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life| Cancer, Health, Medicine, Real People Stories, Brittany Maynard
Brittany Maynard (third from left) and her family at the Grand Canyon Oct. 21
Courtesy Brittany Maynard

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STATE OF MISSION REPORT OCTOBER 2014

Pandora in progress, STRANGE EGG tau complete , TOP EGG in progress, BlueShield 4 in progress. PB breach continuation, severe systems/Isidic security breach deflected, HVBN substable to stable. M=7.

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