We continue today our three-part series:

Life’s
Gifts and Life’s Tragedies – Making sense of it all



Last week I did not have a chance to put out the Bulletin as I was
deeply involved in other matters and could not devote the time to it
that I know this subject deserves. To those of you who were waiting for
our second installment, I apologize. In the first article of this series
I offered an in-depth look at the nature of ultimate reality and the
purpose of God and Life. The article was loaded with esoterics,
including a detailed exploration of the Soul’s journey. But how to make
any of that work for us in any practical way during This Life, Here and
Now? That is the question. And that’s what I promised we would look at
next.

If we embrace, accept, and adopt the ideas
expressed in
Part I of this series, we come away with a whole new notion about
God—about Who and What God IS—and about Life itself. Yet living into
this grander notion is not easy. Everything we have learned in our
lives from our present-day religions, from our cultures, from our
schools and families, flies in the face of it. Further, everything we
are experiencing in our daily lives does so as well.

How,
then, to apply the wisdom and the insight of Conversations with God to
our
daily lives? How, then, to make some sense of Life’s gifts and
Life’s tragedies?

Well, we have to tell ourselves a whole new
story about Who and What We Are. That’s the beginning. We have to tell
ourselves a brand new tale about our own identity and why we are here.

When
Everything Changes, Change Everything
,
the
latest book in the CwG cosmology, tells us that there are Four
Fundamental Questions in Life, the answers to which form the basis of
our understanding and experience of Life Itself. These questions are:

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. Why am I where I am?
4.
What do I choose to do about that?

WECCE (the acronym for the
above title!) also says that there are "no `correct’ answers to these
questions." That is, one answer is no more "accurate" than another. This
is true because we are making it all up. That is, we are
producing our own experience based upon what we decide. Not only about
this, but about everything.

WECCE carefully explains how the
Mind does this when we do it with the Mind Alone, and how the Mind does
this if we do it with the Mind working in concert with the Soul.

Most people do not produce their reality through a collaboration
of the Mind and Soul. Most people use the Mind alone, as a singular
instrument (even though it was never intended to be used is that way).
As a result, the data that most people access in order to answer the
above four questions is very limited.

On the other hand, for
those people who use the Mind AND the Soul collaboratively as WECCE says
we were always meant to do, the data that most people access in order
to answer the above four questions is unlimited. This makes a
world of difference—and a difference in our world.

We must,
therefore, consider Life’s Four Fundamental Questions from the
standpoint of the Mind AND the Soul, not the Mind alone.

When
considered from this expanded perspective (that is, the perspective of
the Mind and Soul looking at Life together), I answer those four
questions this way:

1. Who am I?
I am an
Individuation of Divinity. I am a Singularization of The Singularity. I
am God, manifested in physical form in this present lifetime as a human
being named Neale.

2. Where am I?
I am in
the Realm of the Physical (as opposed to the Realm of the Spiritual).

3. Why am I where I am?
I am in this Realm in
order to express and experience what I know my Self to be when I am in
the Realm of the Spiritual. The Realm of the Spiritual is also known as
the Realm of Knowing. The Realm of the Physical is also known as the
Realm of Experiencing. I have entered this Realm—this place within the
Kingdom of God—in order to know my Self in my own experience.
I am God, "godding." I am God, in the act of Being. And what, exactly,
am I being? I am being all that God is. This may take (and,
indeed, does take) more than one lifetime.

4.
What do I choose to do about that?

Knowing where I am and
why, I now choose to use this particular lifetime to experience as much
of my Self, to express as much of the essence of Who I Am, as I can. In
order to do this, I must first know Who I Am. So the first part
of my journey here on earth has been devoted to the process of
remembering my True Identity, and the second part has been devoted to
the process of expressing that Identity.

This is how it has
been for most people walking the earth. While there are some, a very
few, who know of a certainty Who They Really Are when they are, in
earthly terms, very young (Jesus was said to be one of these, astounding
the Pharisees when, at the age of 12, he taught in the Temple), most of
us use up the largest portion of our years in the humble search for Who
We Are—and then, after we remember Who We Are…in the acceptance of
that. Very little time is then left for the expression of that.
If we have some time left, this is the most sacred time of our lives.

Accepting our True Identity is not easy because, as I said
earlier, it flies in the face of everything we have been taught and
everything we have experienced. The second is true because
everything we have experienced is based upon everything we have been taught.

Our job, then, is to "undo" the teachings. We must say to our
fathers and mothers, and to all those who have taught us about this
life, "you are wrong. You have been mistaken. It is not like what you
think it is like. You are not who you think you are. I am not who you
told me I am."

Only then can we begin to make some sense out of
life. Only then can we comprehend Life’s gifts and Life’s tragedies.
Only then can we
Understand that, in truth, there are no
"tragedies"; that the idea of "tragedy" itself is a mistaken notion,
because we do not live in a runaway Universe, an out-of-control
environment. In fact, the opposite is true. We live in a place (the
Realm of Physicality) where everything makes perfect sense, and is
perfectly manifested, to produce the next perfect opportunity for
Divinity to express and experience Itself as Perfection Itself.

When we understand this, we walk the earth as a Master. We perceive
things as The Buddha did. We embrace "tragedy" as The Christ did (as an
opportunity—yes, the perfect opportunity—for "salvation" of
the Self, and, by example, of the whole human race). We see deeply into
life as The Prophet did.

Now it’s important that I define what
I mean by the word "salvation" as I have used it above. I am not
talking about salvation as in "saving the soul from everlasting
damnation." There is no such thing as everlasting damnation. I am
talking about salvation from not knowing and experiencing Who You Really
Are, and therefore living a life that has nothing to do with that, and
which, in turn, must then necessarily contain and include a great deal
of suffering.

Suffering is never the result of pain. Suffering
is the result of a misunderstanding of what is going on. Many mothers
giving birth, for instance, do not "suffer" from the pain of childbirth,
but, indeed, rejoice in it even as they experience it, for they realize
Who They Are and What They Are Doing Here.

So, too, was it
with Jesus, who understood that, metaphorically, he was "giving birth"
to a new kind of humanity. As was The Buddha, who taught us about the
end of suffering. Life, he said, is suffering…only because we don’t understand
Life. Life is suffering not because that’s what Life intrinsically
is…but because we do not comprehend what Life intrinsically
is. When we do, suffering dissolves, and is no more.

Now this
whole series began with a question: Why do some people suffer and die,
and some people not? The answer to the first part of that question, in
metaphysical terms, is that some people "suffer" because they do not
understand why things are the way they are . The
answer to the second part of that question is that no people "die."
Death is not possible, given Who and What You Are.

When you
understand this, you say, along with masters who have said it before:
"Death, where is thy sting?" You do not fear death, nor do you fear
life. Nor do you mourn the death of others as a "tragedy," but, rather,
see death as a turn in the path on every individual Soul’s journey; a
turn that is perfectly designed to lead that Soul to exactly where it
wishes to go next, as its own evolutionary process continues.

This is another way of saying that nothing can happen to the
individual Soul that is not perfectly placed within the life and
experience of that Soul, and, thus, agreed to by the Soul Itself
.

And THIS is another way of repeating the extraordinary wisdom of Conversations
with
God
when it said: "There are no victims and no villains."

Suddenly, Life begins to make sense. We begin to realize that
there is a Larger Process in place of which we have lost sight.
Something Bigger is going on. The Soul of the individual, as well as the
Collective Soul of humanity, is continually birthing itself anew in
every moment. It is becoming. It is evolving. And…like that
candle flame we talked about last week…it is changing form even as it
is expressing what it is "now."

A flame is never the same from
one nano-second to the next. The nature of a flame itself is that it
"destroys" itself, it burns itself up, even as it is "being" What It Is.
Can a flame be said to be suffering because it is extinguishing itself
even as it illumines? Each illumination of the flame is the result of
its own "burning up." Is the burning up, then, less perfect than the
illumination?

You now understand "Life Gifts and Life’s
Tragedies," and can, at last, make some sense of it all.

In our
final installment next time: Brightening and Burning at the Same Time: a
Look at a Life Well Lived.

Love and Hugs,
Neale.