by JB Bardot
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(NaturalNews) Gout and have two things in common. Each condition makes the body , and they respond to the powerful nutrients found in cherries that eliminate . Cherries contain high levels of antioxidants and anthocyanins, nutrients known to relieve , and stiffness. Cherries belong to an esteemed group of super fruits including blueberries, acai, pomegranate, yumberries, cranberries and goji berries — all providing exceptionally high amounts of these pain-killing compounds. Cherries are rich in polynutrients and anthocyanins, which give the fruit its rich, reddish-purple color — the deeper the color, the higher the level of antioxidants.

 

Raw or Cooked

Whether they're raw or cooked, cherries in any form contain the same anti-inflammatory substances, according to the Health System. They reported that people consuming about 1/2 pound of cherries daily over a period of four weeks noticed significant joint pain relief. To be sure of getting the most from cooked cherries, include the cooking juices.
 

 

Canned

Count canned cherries in when including cherries in a regime of pain-relieving foods. The University of also included canned cherries in its review for helping to relieve aches and associated with musculoskeletal conditions. Keeping a couple of cans of tart cherries in the pantry ensures there will always be something in the house in the event supplies of other cherry products run low. This does not include maraschino, whose natural chemical makeup has been altered by preserving and adding sugar.

 

Juice

Some people swear by the healing effects of drinking tart cherry juice. Tart cherries are thought by some to have the greatest pain-killing power, and Montmorency cherries are considered the most popular sour cherry. Tart cherries are also rich in potassium, which may help the body create an alkaline-forming state, and protect against acidosis, which is a breeding ground for the formation of . Drinking six ounces of tart cherry juice daily is the approximate equivalent to 1/2 pound of raw or cooked cherries. Cherry juice can be diluted with water. Mixing black cherry juice and tart cherry juice provides sweetness, making the drink more palatable for some people.

 

Powder

Taking cherry powder provides a quick, portable, easy way to utilize the benefits of cherries. An animal study funded by the Cherry Marketing Institute in 2008 indicated that rats receiving dried cherry powder had greatly reduced levels of inflammation in their bodies. Additionally, when the cherry powder was fed mixed with a high-fat diet, the rats didn't build body fat or gain weight at the same rate as control animals.

 

Concentrate

Cherry concentrate is simply cherry juice with the excess water removed. It provides a super-punch of pain-relieving nutrients. As little as two ounces a day diluted with water may offer relief for aching joints and muscles and relieve the agonizing pain of gout. Look for organic cherry concentrate to ensure the absence of pesticides and other .

 

Supplements

A variety of supplements contain cherries including capsules, liquid extracts, and snack bars. Cherry supplements may not cure arthritis and gout, but like fresh and cooked cherries and cherry juice, they too offer another way to consume the important chemicals that provide relief for those suffering in pain. Some supplements contain high levels of quercetin and vitamin C as well as antioxidants and anthocyanins. A common daily dose of cherry extract is 2,000 mg divided into four doses throughout the day; however, it's best to consult a health practitioner before taking unfamiliar supplements.

Sources for this article include:

University of Michigan Health System: Gout
http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-li…

Wikipedia.org: Cherry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry

The People's Pharmacy Guide to Home and Herbal Remedies; Joe Graedon, et.al; 2002

NYU Langone Medical Center: Cherries
http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?Chun…

University of Maryland Medical Center: Gout
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/…

University of Michigan Health System: Gout
http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-li…

Wikipedia.org: Cherry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry

The People's Pharmacy Guide to Home and Herbal Remedies; Joe Graedon, et.al; 2002

NYU Langone Medical Center: Cherries
http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?Chun…

University of Maryland Medical Center: Gout
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/…

Produce Oasis: Montmorency Cherry
http://www.produceoasis.com/Items_f…

About the :
JB Bardot is trained in herbal medicine and , and has a post graduate degree in holistic nutrition. Bardot cares for both people and animals, using alternative approaches to health care and lifestyle.
 

Source: NaturalNews