Lincoln addresses the crowd at his second inauguration ceremony in March 1865.  
Here’s a close-up, as Lincoln reads from the podium.

Here, Lincoln stands with Allan Pinkerton (left) and Gen. John McClernand (right). Pinkerton was a Union spy who had saved Lincoln’s life by foiling an early assassination plot. McClernand, an democrat, was one of Lincoln’s closest friends.
In 1858, Lincoln squared off against Stephen Douglas for Illinois’ Senate seat. The battle sparked seven heated debates on slavery. Here, supporters gather outside Lincoln’s Springfield home. Lincoln is the tall, white figure by the doorway.
It’s the summer of 1860, and Lincoln stands outside his Springfield home with his two sons, Willie and Tad (Abe is the tall one behind the fence). Although it was the heat of his presidential run, Lincoln had time to relax at home. He made no speeches during the campaign; his success rode on a wave of outside support.
Lincoln with McClellan after Antietam. Antietam was the first major Civil War battle to happen on Union soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history: 23,000 casualties and over 3,500 killed.
 
This is Lincoln’s last portrait, purportedly taken on April 10, 1865—one week before his assassination. It’s also one of the few portraits that shows Lincoln grinning.

Lincoln was shot April 14, 1865, at Ford’s Theater. Lincoln’s body toured the US for three weeks. The funeral train stopped in New York on April 25 and was displayed in City Hall, shown here.