Is this the origins of the Anunnaki story? ~ Neanderthals & humans first mated 50,000 years ago, DNA reveals

Early European
Universal human: This reconstruction is of a different modern human from Romania 43,000 years ago. But it gives some clues to what the Siberian man may have looked like. This population was not long out of Africa and genetically midway between Europeans and Asians
 
Excerpt from bbc.com

The genome sequence from a thigh bone found in Siberia shows the first episode of mixing occurred between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago.

The male hunter is one of the earliest modern humans discovered in Eurasia.

The study in Nature journal also supports the finding that our species emerged from Africa some 60,000 years ago, before spreading around the world.

The analysis raises the possibility that the human line first emerged millions of years than current estimates.

“We seem to have evolution red handed”

Prof Svante Paabo Max-Plack Institute

 

The work of Prof Svante Paabo, from the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany, is rewriting the of humanity. Prof Paabo and his colleagues have pioneered methods to extract DNA from ancient human remains and its genetic code. From this sequence, Prof Paabo has been able to decipher an increasingly detailed of modern humans as they spread across the globe.

“The amazing thing is that we have a good genome of a 45,000 year old who was close to the ancestor of all present-day humans outside Africa,” Prof Paabo told BBC News. 

Prof Paabo has analysed DNA from of a leg bone of a man that lived in Western Siberia around 45,000 years ago. This is a key at the cross roads of the world, when modern humans were on the of an expansion into Europe and Asia.

Thigh bone  

Prof Paabo Svante has unlocked the secrets contained in this femur from one of the earliest humans discovered out of Africa.

 

The key finding was that the man had large, unshuffled chunks of DNA from a now extinct species of human, Neanderthals who evolved outside of Africa. 

“Our analysis shows that modern humans had already interbred with Neanderthals then and we can determine when that first happened much more precisely than we could before.” 

Prof Paabo and his team published research in 2010 which showed that all non-African humans today have Neanderthal DNA. But that genetic material has been broken into much smaller chunks over the

By extrapolating the of DNA chunks backwards, Prof Paabo and his colleagues were able to calculate when the first interbreeding with Neanderthals occurred. His study shows that it was between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago.

According to Prof Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London, this early interbreeding might indicate when the ancestors of people living outside of Africa today made their first steps out of the continent in which our species evolved more than 150,000 years ago.

Prof Stringer was among those who believed that the first exit by modern humans from Africa that give rise to people outside of Africa today might have happened earlier, possibly 100,000 years ago. The evidence from Prof Paabo’s research is persuading him that it was now much later.

River Irtysh  

Crossroads for humanity: the river Irtysh in Western Siberia where the bone was found. 

Prof Paabo also compared the DNA of the man living 45,000 years ago with those living today. He found that the man was genetically midway between Europeans and Asians – indicating he lived close to the time before our species separated into different racial groups.

Prof Paabo was also able to estimate the rate at which human DNA has changed or mutated over the millennia. He found that it was slower than the rate suggested by fossil evidence and similar to what has been observed in families. 

“We have caught evolution red handed!” Prof Paabo said gleefully.
This raises the possibility that the very first species of the human line separated from apes 10 or 11 million years ago – rather than the five or six million years ago that genetic evidence had previously suggested. 

But he stressed in his research paper that much more analysis was needed before re-dating the emergence of the human line.

“We caution that (mutation) rates may have changed over time and may differ between human populations,” he said.

1 Comment

  1. @Pb_Dirigible After reading, I’m going to say, no. Not the part abt the 1s who messed with Our DNA. But interesting 2 C wht They did

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