Mosaic of four images taken by Rosetta's navigation camera (NAVCAM) on 10 December 2014 at 20.1 km from the centre of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
The ESA comet lander Philae came to rest between two shadowed cliffs, limiting the sunlight hitting the lander’ solar panels, but scientists hope the lander can be revived by February as more light arrives. This image of the comet’ surface is a mosaic of four taken by Rosetta’ navigation on 10.

Hopes rise for reviving the hibernating lander’s solar power as comet receives more sunlight.

 

Excerpt from news.nationalgeographic.com

SAN FRANCISCO—Fear not for Philae: The little lost lander could reawaken as soon as February, the Rosetta mission team said Wednesday. Increasing sunlight almost guarantees an to the probe’s current hibernation on a comet racing toward the sun.


The European Space Agency’s $1.75-billion mission sent the lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 in an audacious, if bumpy, touchdown on the double-lobed comet. It was the first soft landing attempt on a comet.
The lander bounced after an anchoring harpoon failed to fire, turning initial elation to disappointment. After a two- bounce, Philae came to rest one of its three on the comet and the others angled between two shadowed cliffs.
Those cliffs allow, for now, only 4 and 33 minutes of uninterrupted sunlight per day to the probe’s solar panels, not enough to restart it. But the mission team announced at the American Geophysical Union meeting that more sunshine is on .