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Skychart by A. Fazekas/SkySafari
Excerpt from 

Giant, Lunar Triangle and Jovian Shadows A planetary pairing and moon dances take center stage in the heavens this week.

Neptune meets this week for stargazers, while Jupiter’s retinue plays shadow games.

Neptune and Mars. About an hour after sunset on Monday, January 19, look towards the southwestern sky for and Mercury hanging near the horizon. Look higher up to see the ruddy beacon of Mars.

Telescopes trained on the red planet will reveal the very faint and aquamarine disk of Neptune only 0.2 degrees north. The distant ice giant present quite a color contrast with ruddy Mars.

A stunning celestial trio low in the southwest sky forms this week with the crescent moon, Venus and Mercury.
 

Lunar Triangle. Just after the sun sets on Wednesday, January 21, gaze towards the crescent moon, which rests low in the sky toward the western horizon.

Joining it in a stunning triangular formation, and particularly eye-catching through binoculars, are the two innermost planets in our solar system, Mercury and Venus.

The waxing moon acts as a wonderfully convenient guide to spotting these two worlds.

Moon meets Mars. On Thursday, January 22, Earth’s lone natural satellite rises higher in the sky and pays a visit to the red planet. The curl of ’s crescent will almost seem to point to Mars, just off to its left.

And just one more day, on Friday, January 23, when the moon will its journey across the sky, climbing higher to form a straight line connection with Mars and Venus. The dawn star will hang below its two companions, just above the horizon.

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This skychart shows the moon pointing to Uranus in the early morning western sky.

Skychart by A. Fazekas/SkySafari

Moon and Uranus. After night falls on , January 25, look for the moon pairing up with the planet from the sun, Uranus.

The two solar system objects will reside only 7 degrees apart, making them just fit into the same field of view in binoculars.

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Look for Jupiter in the early morning southeast sky and with a telescope soak in a triple Jovian moon shadow transit.

Skychart by A. Fazekas/SkySafari

Triplet Jovian Eclipse. In the early morning hours of Saturday, January 24, telescopes will reveal a trio of tiny black dots trekking across the face of Jupiter.

Three of the gas giant’s moons, Calisto, Io, and Europa all their shadows tight on the cloud tops of Jupiter at once starting at 1:27 am EST to 1:53 am .

Happy hunting!